American Alpine Club Announces 2019 US Team for the UIAA World Cup Ice Climbing Competition in Denver, CO

Golden, CO, December 5, 2018—The American Alpine Club (AAC), America’s oldest non-profit organization for climbers, is thrilled to announced the 2019 USA World Cup Ice Climbing Team. The team of 21 male and female athletes is set to compete in the upcoming UIAA World Cup Ice Climbing Tour, and 18 will compete here in Denver, CO. February 23 – 24, 2019.

 The AAC led the application process and final selection of the 2019 USA Team. Criteria was based on national rankings from recent competitive ice climbing seasons and events, and a preference for athletes who compete in cross-disciplinary ice competition (e.g. athletes that compete in both the Difficulty (Lead) and Speed competitions). The AAC also provided “developmental” spots on the team for less experienced competition climbers who demonstrate exceptional talent and commitment to the sport. Equal team positions were available for men and women in the performance (6) and developmental (2) categories.

 The final 2019 USA Team consists of 21 adults and 10 youth members.Phil Powers, CEO at the AAC said “These athletes represent the cutting edge of one of the more wild versions of the climbing craft. I am astounded every time I witness their gymnastics and delicate skill all performed far off the ground with ice axes and crampons.”

The 2019 event is the first time the Ice Climbing World Tour has come to Denver, Colorado and the first time a World Cup Finals event has been held in the USA. The weekend event will be held in Denver’s Civic Center Park and is free to the public. The ice climbing competition will take place over two days with qualifying rounds on Sat, Feb 23, and semi-finals and overall finals on Sun, Feb 24. The event is expected to attract over 200 athletes from 21 countries around the world to compete for the overall World Cup in both Difficulty and Speed categories.

Competition ice climbing combines formidable over-hanging walls of ice with artful technique and sheer power. In the lead discipline, ice climbers require great technique, tactical mastery and nerves of steel to execute complex moves in seemingly improbable positions dozens of feet above the ground. The speed discipline is almost a vertical take on the 100m sprint in the sport of athletics. In 2014, competitive ice climbing debuted as an exhibition sport at the Sochi Winter Olympics and is hopeful for a full-scale Olympic debut in the near future.

 

2019 USA World Cup Ice Climbing Team: 

Denver World Cup Finals:

Mens Lead:

Tyler Kempney

Thomas Gehrlein

Aaron Montgomery

Grant Kleeves

Kevin Lindlau

Wesley Fowler

Carter Stritch

Troy Anger

 

Womens Lead: 

Corey Buhay

Catalina Shirley

Claire Poppendeck

Mikayla Tougas

Angela Tomczik

Angela Limbach

Kendra Stritch

Mens Speed:

Tyler Kempney

Thomas Gehrlein

Kevin Lindlau

Wesley Fowler

Marcus Garcia

Jake Bourdow

Troy Anger

Carter Stritch

 

Womens Speed:

Corey Buhay

Catalina Shirley

Claire Poppendeck

Angela Tomczik

Angela Limbach

Kendra Stritch

Lindsay Hastings

2018/2019 International World Cup Events:

Mens Team: 

Tyler Kempney

Thomas Gehrlein

Kevin Lindlau

Carter Stritch

Troy Anger

Liam Foster

Cody Stevenson

Andrew Lamb

Marcus Garcia

Carter Stritch

 

Womens Team:

Angela Tomczik

Angela Limbach

Kendra Stritch

Lindsay Hastings

 

World Cup Youth Team:

Keenan Griscom

Calvin Daugherty

Kylie Cullen

Georgia Witchel

Aubrey Palmer

Maija Fox

MaKenzee Van Buren

Liam Foster

Cody Stevenson

Mikayla Tougas

Katie Seymour

Lindsay Levine

Christopher Atchison

Catalina Shirley

 

Support the USA Ice Climbing Team.

Read more about the 2019 USA World Cup Team here:

https://americanalpineclub.org/world-cup/2018/11/26/2019-usa-world-cup-ice-climbing-team

2019 Denver Ice Climbing World Cup Schedule:

Friday, Feb 22                     Opening Ceremony

Saturday, Feb 23                  8AM – 8PM // Lead Qualifiers, Speed Qualifiers

Sunday, Feb 24                    8AM – 5PM // Lead Semi-Finals, Lead Finals, Speed Finals, Closing Ceremony, After Party (hosted by the AAC)

About American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united

community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world’s most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world’s leading climbing library and country’s leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers’ Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and gives $100,000+ annually toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org

 

 

American Alpine Club Engages the Veteran Community with New Membership Options and Outreach

Golden, CO, November 8, 2018 The American Alpine Club (AAC), America’s oldest and largest climbing advocacy non-profit, is proudly expanding the organization’s efforts to engage active-duty military and veterans through new membership options and proactive outreach. The effort—led in large part by active-duty military members of the American Alpine Club—seeks to engage the veteran community by offering discounted club membership, hosting veteran-focused climbing events, and promoting wellness and camaraderie through the pursuit of climbing.

In spring 2018, the American Alpine Club launched a new grassroots public lands advocacy initiative known as “Hill to Crag” with the intention to take elected officials and their staff rock-climbing. The event quickly expanded in scope once AAC’s Salt Lake Chapter Chair Byron Harvison became involved. Harvison, a life-long climber and active-duty US Army Major, saw the events as an opportunity to share his and other veterans’ experiences with rock climbing and public land with lawmakers.

“After returning home from an intense deployment in Afghanistan, I found climbing not only to be a retreat back to what I loved, but a good place to settle my thoughts,” says Army Major Harvison, “In my role in the Armed Forces, I’ve seen many people deal with substance abuse and depression post deployment. Climbing facilitates positive community engagement, healthy lifestyle, and connection to wild landscapes.”

Together with Major Harvison, the American Alpine Club has organized four “Hill to Crag” events in 2018 and is rolling out a new AAC Veteran Chapter, which Harvison will Chair. The AAC also plans to extend a special membership discount to active-duty military and veterans starting in early 2019.

Phil Powers, American Alpine Club CEO, added, “The American Alpine Club has been closely linked with our nation’s armed forces for a long time. The advocacy that created the 10th Mountain Division during WWII—and the training that followed—came largely from AAC leadership. The creation of a Veterans Chapter and Major Harvison's work connecting legislators and veterans through Hill to the Crag events are logical outgrowths of this history.”

2018 Hill to Crag Event Schedule:

November 16, 2018—Chimney Rock State Park, North Carolina

October 19, 2018—Vedauwoo Recreation Area, Wyoming

October 12, 2018—Golden, Colorado, VIDEO: https://youtu.be/W5Iw1fDigHE

May 26, 2018—Joe’s Valley, Utah

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About American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world’s most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world’s leading climbing library and country’s leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers’ Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and gives $150,000+ annually toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org

Access Fund and American Alpine Club Award $10,000 in Grants to Replace Aging Bolts

Golden, CO, October 15, 2018—The Access Fund and American Alpine Club are pleased to announce the 2018 Anchor Replacement Fund grant awards. Now in its third year, the grant program launched to address the growing concerns of anchor failure and the access issues that could result from these incidents. This year, we are thrilled to announce funding for nine worthy anchor replacement projects across the country.

Rocky Pass/Gallatin Canyon, MT - Southwest Montana Climbers Coalition

Southwest Montana Climbers Coalition (SMCC) was awarded funding to replace plated 3/8” wedge anchors with 1/2” stainless steel sleeve and glue-in anchors using sustainable replacement techniques (hole re-use) to preserve the character of the routes and the rock. SMCC will engage local volunteers to expand their ability to tackle aging bolts at the gneiss and limestone crags in the region.

Red River Gorge, KY - Red River Gorge Fixed Gear Initiative

Red River Gorge Fixed Gear Initiative (RRGFGI) was awarded funding to replace rusting and aging hardware on the steep sandstone cliffs throughout the region with 1/2” stainless glue-in anchors. RRGFGI is planning to replace over 300 bad bolts in 2019 and is striving to keep bad bolts in the region to fewer than 50 at any given time. RRGFGI works to replace aging bolts throughout the Red River Gorge region.

Slab Camp, KY - Morehead Tourism Commission

Morehead Tourism Commission was awarded funding to tackle rebolting efforts at Slab Camp, a half-mile section of cliff line featuring approximately 60 routes that were originally bolted in the early 1990s with hardware store bolts and anchors. The routes include a mix of both sport and traditional, with all sport routes requiring new bolts and anchors and all traditional routes in need of new anchors. All bolts will be replaced with 1/2” stainless steel glue-ins. The Morehead Tourism Commission has enlisted the help of local climbers and rebolting experts from the Red River Gorge Fixed Gear Initiative to assist them with the effort through training and consultation on rebolting practices.

Shawangunk Mountains, NY - Mohonk Preserve

The Mohonk Preserve was awarded funding to replace eight tree and piton anchors in the Gunks with 1/2” stainless steel sleeve anchors. New bolted anchors placed below the cliff top will reduce climber impacts to the top of the cliff on routes like Gelsa in the Near Trapps. They will also replace aging piton anchors on popular routes like Son of Easy O in the Trapps.

Obed, TN - East Tennessee Climbers’ Coalition

East Tennessee Climbers’ Coalition (ETCC) was awarded funding to support their goal of rebolting the entire Obed in 5 years. ETCC is tackling replacement of approximately 4,000 aging bolts, which are all approaching 30 years of age, throughout the popular northeast Tennessee climbing area. ETCC has already undertaken this massive challenge, enlisting the help of volunteers and replacing 730 bolts with 1/2” stainless steel anchors this year alone.

Smith Rock, OR - High Desert Climbers Alliance

High Desert Climbers Alliance (HDCA) was awarded funding to replace aging hardware at Smith Rock State Park in central Oregon. HDCA will engage local volunteer bolt replacers to replace aging plated hardware that has been in the rock for over 40 years with long last 1/2” stainless steel hardware.

Boulder Canyon, CO - Boulder Climbing Community

Boulder Climbing Community (BCC) was awarded funding for rebolting efforts in Boulder Canyon and other Front Range climbing areas. The BCC will purchase 100 1/2” stainless steel sleeve bolts and hangers, as well as 40 anchor set-ups. Their annual rebolting events will take place at North Table Mountain, Boulder Canyon, and Clear Creek Canyon.

Spearfish Canyon, SD - Black Hills Climbers Coalition

The Black Hills Climbers Coalition (BHCC) was awarded funding to replace aging anchors at popular crags throughout Spearfish Canyon. The BHCC is tackling replacement of 300+ routes, which were equipped 25 years ago with plated and mixed metals. The BHCC will replace these aging anchors using high quality stainless steel glue-ins to meet the highest standards for fixed anchors at limestone sport climbing areas.

Ten Sleep Cayon, WY - Bighorn Climbers Coalition

The Bighorn Climbers Coalition (BCC) was awarded funding to address aging anchors in Ten Sleep Canyon. The BCC will focus on replacing wedge bolts, cold shuts, and worn lower-off anchors throughout the canyon. These will be replaced with 1/2” stainless steel bolts and high quality ring anchors and lower-off hooks specifically manufactured for climbing.

About Access Fund

Access Fund is the national advocacy organization that keeps climbing areas open and conserves the climbing environment. Founded in 1991, Access Fund supports and represents millions of climbers nationwide in all forms of climbing: rock climbing, ice climbing, mountaineering, and bouldering. Six core programs support the mission on national and local levels: climbing policy and advocacy, stewardship and conservation, local support and mobilization, land acquisition and protection, risk management and landowner support, and education. For more information, visit www.accessfund.org.

About American Alpine Club
The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world’s most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world’s leading climbing library and country’s leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers’ Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and gives $100,000+ annually toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org



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American Alpine Club to Host 2019 UIAA World Cup Ice Climbing Competition in Denver, CO.

Golden, CO, June 26, 2018—The American Alpine Club (AAC), America’s oldest and largest non-profit organization for climbers, is pleased to announce that UIAA World Cup Ice Climbing is coming to Denver, Colorado February 23–24, 2019. The new North American tour stop will serve as the 2018 / 2019 World Cup Ice Climbing Finals in which over 200 athletes from 26 countries around the world will compete for the overall World Cup in both Lead and Speed categories.

The 2019 event is the first time the Ice Climbing World Tour has come to Denver, Colorado. The weekend event will be held in Denver’s Civic Center Park and will be free to the public. The ice climbing competition will take place over two days with qualifying rounds on Sat, Feb 23, and semi-finals and overall finals on Sun, Feb 24.

"We are proud to support our U.S. ice climbing athletes and bring this impressive event to downtown Denver," said American Alpine Club CEO, Phil Powers. "Competitive ice climbing is one of the most exciting things I've ever watched; the stamina, skill, and seeming impossibility of it all makes for an outstanding spectator experience. They’re up there doing crazy moves, wielding sharp tools and they hang on forever.”

Competition ice climbing combines formidable over-hanging walls of ice with artful technique and sheer power. In the lead discipline, ice climbers require great technique, tactical mastery and nerves of steel to ascend seemingly improbable icy pillars dozens of feet above the ground. The speed discipline is most closely akin to all out vertical sprint using ice axes and crampons. In 2014, competitive ice climbed debuted as an exhibition sport at the Sochi Winter Olympics. The sport is currently being considered for full-scale Olympic inclusion in the 2022 Winter Games in Beijing .

Luis Benitez, Director of the Colorado Office of Outdoor Recreation Industry and event partner, also commented, “Ice climbing has a strong presence in the culture of outdoor recreation in Colorado. From our world class ice park in Ouray, to our iconic routes in Vail and Rocky Mountain National Park, this is a sport whose time has come. We are thrilled to welcome the World Cup event to Denver in February to highlight just how special ice climbing is and share that feeling with the rest of the country watching!”

The 2019 Denver World Cup Ice Climbing Competition is being hosted by the Golden, CO based American Alpine Club in partnership with the UIAA (International Climbing and Mountaineering Federation and tour organizer), the Civic Center Conservancy, Denver Sports Commission, Visit Denver, Colorado Office of Outdoor Recreation Industry, and the Denver Office of Special Events.

“We’re thrilled to help host this exciting international event in Denver’s historic Civic Center Park and expose this amazing sport to a larger population than ever in North America,” said Scott Robson, Executive Director of the non-profit Civic Center Conservancy, “Civic Center Park is the heart of Denver and has hosted iconic events for over a century. Hosting the 2019 World Cup Ice Climbing finale in such an urban setting will not only make this competition accessible to multitudes of new fans, but will also be visually stunning to watch.”

US athletes who wish to compete at the 2019 Denver World Cup will be able to earn entry at qualifying competitions. 

For additional information, including how to become a sponsor, please contact: Vickie Hormuth at [email protected] or visit: americanalpineclub.org/uiaa-federation/ 

Denver Ice Climbing World Cup Schedule:

Friday, Feb 22               
Athlete Registration

Saturday, Feb 23           
Lead Qualifiers, Speed Qualifiers

Sunday, Feb 24                
Lead Semi-Finals, Lead Finals, Speed Finals, Closing Ceremony, After Party (hosted by the American Alpine Club)


About American Alpine Club
The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world’s most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world’s leading climbing library and country’s leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers’ Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and gives $100,000+ annually toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org

2018 Live Your Dream Grant Recipients Announced

May 16, 2018, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club (AAC) and The North Face are proud to announce the recipients of the 2018 Live Your Dream grant. In total, $72,150 was awarded to 158 individuals from across the nation, making 2018 the most successful year in the history of the Live Your Dream grant program. Roughly one out of every three applicants received an award. See the complete listing of grant recipients and their trips.
 
The climbing grant for climbers, by climbers, the Live Your Dream grant seeks to fund every-day adventurers looking take their abilities to the next level. Be it transitioning out of the gym or establishing a first ascent in the greater ranges, the purpose of this grant is to support and promote unforgettable experiences for mountain adventurers—to dream big, to grow, and to inspire others.
 
The Live Your Dream grant is powered nationally by The North Face and supported locally through generous contributions from the Hans Saari Fund, the John L. Horn Memorial Fund, the Mount Washington Valley Ice Fest, proceeds stemming from the AAC's Craggin Classic Series, as well as private donations from local individuals, organizations, and fundraising efforts by local AAC Sections & Chapters.
 
The Live Your Dream grant is community developed and locally administered with grant applications read, evaluated, and awarded by seven Regional Selection Committees comprised of local community members, volunteers, and professional athletes.
 
The 2019 Live Your Dream grant cycle will open for applications on February 1, 2019.
 
FEATURED RECIPIENTS:
 
Auri Clark, from Juneau, Alaska, was awarded $400 for an all-female expedition to complete first ascents of two unnamed peaks near the Stikine Icefield. 
 
Stormy Saint-Val, from Cambridge, Massachusetts, was awarded $450 to improve her climbing skills and attend the Color the Crag climbing festival in October.
 
Arthur Whitehead, from Golden, Colorado, was awarded $500 to climb and ski Artesonraju in the Cordillera Blanca in Peru, with secondary objectives including climbing and skiing Huascarán Sur or Pisco Oeste, and climb Alpamayo. 
 
Trevor Bowman, from Flagstaff, Arizona, was awarded $1,000 to establish a new route up the east face of the Innominate (12,761’) in Wyoming’s Big Horn Mountains.
 
View all of the winners.
 

About American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Rumney Rattlesnake Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $100,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org

The American Alpine Club Announces 2018 ‘Excellence in Climbing’ Honors and Benefit Evening

May 1, 2018, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club (AAC), the country's oldest and largest climbing and mountaineering member organization, is thrilled to announce the organization's 2018 inductees to the Hall of Mountaineering Excellence and the winner of the 2018 H Adams Carter Literary Award. The honors, which recognize a lifetime of achievement in their respective categories, will be bestowed at the 3rd Annual Excellence in Climbing Celebration on June 2, 2018 at the History Colorado Center.

The Hall of Mountaineering Excellence recognizes those who have made lasting contributions both on and off the mountain. The 2018 inductees are a truly impressive class of climbers and alpinists, who have used their knowledge and success to positively influence new generations of climbers.

2018 Inductees to the Hall of Mountaineering Excellence:

Danika Gilbert - For her work with ASCEND: Leadership Through Athletics, empowering young Afghan women through climbing to become leaders who are equipped and motivated to help their society transition to peace.

David Roberts - For his storied career as a published author of over 20 books and mentorship of young  authors, preserving and growing the art of storytelling.

Doug Chabot - For co-founding the Iqra Fund, which provides access to quality education, especially for girls in the remote regions of northern Pakistan, improving their quality of life.

The H. Adams Carter Literary Award was established to recognize excellence in climbing literature. Recipients of this award have contributed extensively to the art and include honorees like Jon Krakauer, Katie Ives, John Long, and Alison Osius.

2018 H. Adams Carter Literary Award: Jeff Jackson - For a decade of dedication and inspiring work at Rock & Ice magazine.

The celebration event will be held on Saturday June 2, 2018, at History Colorado Center located at 1200 N Broadway, Denver, CO 80203. The evening includes presentations by honorees, a cocktail reception, live and silent auctions, libations, and food. And since no AAC function would be complete without a dance party, the evening will be appropriately capped-off with live 80's music by The Goonies, along with more drinks, games, and gear giveaways.

All event proceeds benefit The American Alpine Club Library and The Bradford Washburn American Mountaineering Museum, dedicated to preserving and celebrating our shared climbing history.

Tickets are very limited. For more information about the weekend activities and to reserve your spot, call (303) 384-0110 or visit americanalpineclub.org/excellence.

Registration closes on May 29, or when sold out.

About American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Rumney Rattlesnake Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $100,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org

 

The American Alpine Club and Access Fund Set Sights on Third Annual “Climb the Hill”

Climbers to advocate for public lands, climbing access and land management,

and federal support of outdoor recreation

April 13, 2018, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club (AAC) and Access Fund— two of our country’s foremost climbing advocacy non-profit organizations—are teaming up for a challenging ascent: Washington, DC’s Capitol Hill. The climbing advocacy organizations will return to Capitol Hill May 9 – 11 for their annual Climb the Hill campaign, meeting with law and policy makers and to advocate for public lands, outdoor recreation, and improved climbing management—and they’re bringing an elite team of professional climbers, outdoor industry leaders, and grassroots partners to help.

Access Fund estimates that nearly 60 percent of all rock climbing areas in the US are located on federal public land. Together, The American Alpine Club and Access Fund will advocate for balanced land management policy, with a focus on the Land Water Conservation Fund and Antiquities Act. The organizations plan to pursue legislative and administrative efforts to increase access to public lands, defend environmental protections and pursue balanced energy policies on public lands.

The two organizations are tapping a wide delegation of renowned professional climbers, including Sasha DiGiulian, Alex Honnold, Lynn Hill, Tommy Caldwell, and Margo Hayes among others. They will be joined by prominent outdoor industry executives from Patagonia, Adidas, The North Face, Patagonia, CLIF, and REI. Non-profit partners include Outdoor Alliance (OA), Latino Outdoors, Brothers of Climbing, Brown Girls Climb, American Mountain Guides Association (AMGA) and the Outdoor Industry Association (OIA).

“Climb the Hill is an incredible opportunity to bring the climbing community together and ensure we have a seat at the decision-making table. It’s a privilege to lead this project with our partners at Access Fund who have spent years working on policy issues and meeting with lawmakers. With so many attacks on public lands, this is the time to work together and galvanize climbers,” said AAC’s Policy Director Maria Povec.

“This is an opportunity for Access Fund and American Alpine Club to bring together climbing industry leaders and professional climbers to support our common cause. Climbers have helped shape our public lands system for well over a century, and we are committed to protecting our unique American landscape,” says Access Fund Policy Director Erik Murdock.

Learn more about this joint project at: ClimbTheHill.org

 

About American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Rumney Rattlesnake Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $100,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org

 

About Access Fund

Access Fund is the national advocacy organization and accredited land trust that keeps climbing areas open and conserves the climbing environment. Founded in 1991, Access Fund supports and represents millions of climbers nationwide in all forms of climbing: rock climbing, ice climbing, mountaineering, and bouldering. Six core programs support the mission on national and local levels: climbing policy and advocacy, stewardship and conservation, local support and mobilization, land acquisition and protection, risk management and landowner support, and education. Access Fund is the largest US climbing advocacy organization with over 20,000 members and 100 local affiliates. Access Fund advocates for climbers at the local and national levels, and maintains active Memorandums of Understanding with the National Park Service, US Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management. For more information, visit www.accessfund.org

 

2018 American Alpine Club Research Grant Recipients Announced

March 23, 2018, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club (AAC) is proud to announce the recipients of the 2018 Research Grants, powered by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy (NREL) and supported by Icebreaker, Kavu, the Henry Gholz Memorial Fund, and the following endowments: Lara-Karena Bitenieks Kellogg Memorial Fund, Scott Fischer Memorial Fund, Arthur K. Gilkey Memorial Fund and the Bedayn Research Fund.

The AAC Research Grants program supports scientific endeavors in mountain environments around the world. Congratulations to the 2018 Research Grant recipients:

Zeke Baker - $1,500

Bridging climbing access and impacts in a multi-use landscape: A historical political ecology of climbing in Indian Creek, Utah

Zeke Baker is a PhD candidate in Sociology at the University of California, Davis. He is investigating how various groups - rock climbers, ranchers, Native Americans, landowners, government officials, and scientists - have impacted the landscape of the Indian Creek region of Utah, and how they evaluate and make meaningful their respective impacts.  

Marie Faust - $1,225

Reproductive consequences of climate change-driven alterations in co-flowering between two subalpine plant species

Marie Faust is a master’s student in Plant Biology and Conservation at Northwestern University. She is examining how climate-driven shifts in co-flowering can affect competition for pollinator services and reproductive success in a subalpine plant species at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory in Gothic, Colorado.

Jessica Gilbert - $1,500

Assessing the impact of anthropogenic activities on high altitude biodiversity in Huascaran National Park, Peru

Jessica Gilbert is a PhD candidate in Wildlife and Fisheries Science at Texas A&M University. Her study aims to assess the impact of human activities on high altitude biodiversity in Andean ecosystems in Huascaran National Park, Peru, comparing the spatial use of habitat by mammalian carnivores in “pristine” environments and areas affected by livestock grazing our tourism activities.

Ethan Guzek - $1,020

Proposed Rockfall and Slope Stability Hazard Assessment, Frenchman Coulee Climbing Area

Ethan Guzek is a master’s student in Engineering Geology at the University of Washington. He is using standard engineering geological methods for studying rock-slope stability and rock fall hazards to conduct a safety assessment for the Sunshine Wall at the Frenchman Coulee climbing area in Washington.

Andrew Hoffman - $1,500

Deriving elevation change, validating GPRI-derived glacier velocities, and using citizen science to enrich public awareness of regional climate change on Mt. Baker, WA

Andrew Hoffman is a PhD candidate in Earth and Space Sciences at the University of Washington. He is investigating glacier speed and retreat on Mt. Baker, Washington using photogrammetry-kinematic GPS surveys, a process that incorporates citizen science efforts.

Rachel Kreb - $1,225

Ecological Restoration: Cushion Plant Facilitation on Alpine Trails

Rachel Kreb is a master’s student in Environmental Biology at Regis University. She is investigating how cushion plants respond to human-caused disturbance along restored and existing trails on Mt. Yale in Colorado.

Marti March Salas - $1,220

The effect of rock climbing on Mediterranean cliff vegetation: Implementation of an innovative and comprehensive methodology in a wide geographical range

Marti March Salas is a PhD student in Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology at the National Museum of Natural Sciences in Madrid, Spain. He is investigating the impacts of rock climbing on cliffside plant communities in Mediterranean environments by conducting surveys of species richness, plant composition, and vegetation cover in climbing locations in the US, Chile, Spain, and France.

Amy Sturgill - $1,500

Pine Creek Recreation Interaction Study: The Role of Outdoor Recreation in Shaping Sierra Nevada Bighorn Sheep Habitat Selection

Amy Sturgill is a biologist with the Sierra Nevada Bighorn Sheep Foundation and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. She is investigating the impacts of recreational use in Pine Creek Canyon, Sierra Nevada, California, on Sierra bighorn sheep habitat selection.

Thank you to our partners and Research Grant Committee members: Danika Gilbert, Louis Reichardt, Matt Hepp, Micah Jessup, and Emily Fenwick.

Part of the AAC’s mission is to respect and support the areas we enjoy, and one of the most important ways to do that is by funding research to better understand such environments. Learn more about the Research Grant: https://americanalpineclub.org/research-grants.

 

About the American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Rumney Rattlesnake Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $80,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at americanalpineclub.org.

 

 

 

Deanne Buck to Lead American Alpine Club’s Board of Directors

March 1, 2018, Golden, CO— The American Alpine Club (AAC), America’s oldest non-profit organization for climbers, is thrilled to announce Deanne Buck as incoming President of the AAC Board of Directors. Buck joins the AAC as Executive Director at Camber Outdoors, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting more inclusive, innovative active-outdoor industries through gender diversity in the workplace.

As a young person growing up in Grand Island, Nebraska, Buck credits a “25-foot high wood panel wall at a YMCA” as having changed her life. From these humble beginnings, Buck went on to integrate climbing and advocacy for climbers as a central purpose to her life. Following graduation from law school, Buck found herself working with climbing brands as an attorney until eventually joining the Access Fund as Program Director in 2003. In 2010, Buck joined the AAC as Development Director, later transitioning to a volunteer position on the AAC’s Board of Directors.  

 

Much of Buck’s professional work has focused around making outdoor experiences more accessible, both in terms of land use policy and promoting equity and diversity. Of her appointment to lead the American Alpine Club into the future, Buck says, "I am honored and humbled to serve as the President of the AAC as we are poised to move into our next chapter of influence and inclusion."

 

Phil Powers, CEO of the AAC noted both Buck’s resume and her perspective of inclusion, “Deanne’s impressive history of advocating for climbers, negotiating conservation solutions, and advancing inclusivity makes her the clear choice for President. It's a challenging job, and I know she’ll do it well.”

Buck will succeed Matt Culbertson, who has served as AAC Board President from 2016-2018.

 

About American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world’s most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world’s leading climbing library and country’s leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers’ Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and gives $100,000+ annually toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org

 

American Alpine Club Hits New Benchmark with Over 20,000 Members

January 19, 2018, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club, the country’s oldest and largest climbing and mountaineering member organization, has hit a new benchmark of over 20,000 members. Record membership comes at a time when climbing is blossoming across the US, especially in urban areas and indoor climbing faciliaties. The American Alpine Club, founded in 1902 primarily as a social club for elite adventurers, has evolved significantly over the last century to meet the changing needs of the US climbing community.

As a champion for climbing advocacy, community, and the preservation of climbing landscapes, The American Alpine Club has steadily expanded its operations to include lodging and camping solutions adjacent to popular climbing areas, offer grants to support environmental conversation and climbing exploration, provide educational opportunities to beginner climbers, and continue to host community events like the Craggin’ Classics, Hueco Rock Rodeo, and the International Climbers’ Meet (ICM).

“Watching our membership quadruple to 20,000 over the last few years has been a testament to our community and what we can do together,” said Phil Powers, CEO of The American Alpine Club, “The benefits are great but people stay because they care about sharing knowledge, participating in efforts to conserve our climbing environment and advocating for the landscapes in which we climb."

Join the club and learn more about the AAC’s impact by visiting: www.americanalpineclub.org

About American Alpine Club
The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $100,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org

 

2018 Cutting Edge Grant Recipients Announced

January 15, 2018, Golden, CO— The American Alpine Club (AAC) is pleased to annouce the recipients of the 2018 Cutting Edge Grant. The Cutting Edge Grant continues the Club’s tradition supporting climbing athletes in pursuit of world-class climbing and mountaineering objectives.

The Cutting Edge Grant seeks to fund individuals planning expeditions to remote areas featuring unexplored mountain ranges, unclimbed peaks, difficult new routes, first free ascents, or similar world-class pursuits. Objectives featuring a low-impact style and leave-no-trace mentality are looked upon with favor.  For the 2018 grant cycle, the AAC received awarded $20,000 to four recipients:

Kurt Ross ($6,000) to visit a seldom traveled region within the eastern Pakistani
Karakoram to establish a first ascent on the unclimbed peak, Karmading Brakk via
the Lachit Valley. This 6000m peak is an untouched gem, so striking it certainly
would have been previously attempted had it not been for historically restrictive
military control in the area. With these military restricts lifted, and the government
currently granting permits to climbers, Kurt and his team are ready for action.

Alan Rousseau ($6,000) to attempt the remote north face of Chiling II (6400m), in
Zanskar-Kashmir- Kishtwar region of Himal India. With a difficult, mostly
unsupported approach and hard climbing at altitude, this objective represents a
step forward in Alan’s climbing and likely one of the harder north faces he and his
team have ever attempted.

Whitney Clark ($5,000) to lead an all-woman team to the Zanskar-Kashmir-
Kishtwar region of Himal India to attempt the main summit of Arjuna’s (6230m)
West Face. Their chosen route takes the team up a steep 1400m unclimbed buttress, which lies to the left of all current established routes. The peak is accessed via a complex icefall, followed by technical high-alpine climbing. It is their goal to climb the route free and operate in a fast, light ethic.

Ryan Johnson ($3,000) to travel to the Alaska Range to attempt the East Face of Mt. Hayes (4215m). Ryan attempted the line in 2013 but extreme cold and illness
shut down the expedition. The line on Hayes is primarily an ice hose, with a 600m
steep mixed section.

The Cutting Edge Grant is supported in part by Global Rescue, the world’s leading provider of integrated travel risk and evacuation memberships. CEG recipients are additionally awarded a one-year, full Global Rescue Membership—an upgrade to the standard AAC rescue coverage. Upgraded benefits include: $500,000 of rescue evacuation; repatriation back to the US; deployed Global Rescue Personnel; and more—a service intended to help AAC members climb hard and return home safely.

The American Alpine Club has inspired and supported cutting-edge climbing achievements for over 100 years.  From funding the first ascent of Mt. Logan in 1925 to the exploration of the Karakoram in 1938, to the 2006 first ascent of Nanga Parbat’s Rupal Face, the AAC has stood to support climbers who push their physical and mental limits and celebrated their accomplishments.

Applications for the Cutting Edge Grant are accepted each year from October 1st through November 30th. For more information, visit: https://americanalpineclub.org/cutting-edge-grant/

For more information on Global Rescue and their memberships, visit: https://www.globalrescue.com/

About American Alpine Club
The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $100,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org.

 

2018 Climbing Awards Announced by The American Alpine Club

America’s Top Climbing Awards Honor Alex Honnold and Sally Jewell, among others

January 11, 2018, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club is delighted to announce the winners of the 2018 Climbing Awards honoring the most impactful climbers and conservationists within the North American climbing community. Among this year’s award honorees are big-wall free-solo pioneer Alex Honnold, teenage climbing prodigy Margo Hayes, and former US Secretary of Interior Sally Jewell.

The Annual Climbing Awards, presented by The American Alpine Club, are the longest running and most prestigious awards honoring climbing and conservation achievement in North America. The awards recognize the most dedicated and prolific climbers of their generation as well as those who have demonstrated outstanding commitment to conservation issues.

Phil Powers, American Alpine Club CEO, commented, “Though climbing's popularity has exploded recently, it was long the domain of a few bold souls. Difficult and dangerous, it is a metaphor for much in life and an inspiration to many. These awards and the people who have earned them are that inspiration.”

Top athletes recognized by the 2018 Climbing Awards include Alex Honnold, Margo Hayes, and John Roskelley. Conservation and volunteerism awards will go to Sally Jewell and Ellen Lapham.

Alex Honnold, winner of the 2018 The Robert and Miriam Underhill Award, is best known for his bold free-solo ascents in Yosemite as well as visionary ascents in Zion, El Potrero Chico, and Patagonia. Margo Hayes, winner of the 2018 The Robert Hicks Bates Award, is a climbing prodigy who as a teenager successfully climbed two 5.15a routes; considered among the most difficult routes in the world ever climbed by a woman. Roskelley, nominated for Honorary Membership, was a leader on the original American ascent team of K2 in 1978 and is renowned for high-altitude first ascents across the Himalaya.

The Annual Climbing Awards will be presented in-person to awardees at the 2018 American Alpine Club Annual Dinner, Feb 24 in Boston, MA. Past award-winners have included Yvon Chouinard, Fred Becky, Tommy Caldwell, Michael Kennedy, among other climbing legends. To purchase tickets to the Annual Dinner Event and learn more about the American Alpine Club’s Climbing Awards, please visit americanalpineclub.org/abd-awards/.

2018 Climbing Award Recipients:

Honorary Membership

Recognizing individuals who have had a lasting and highly significant impact on the advancement of the climbing craft.

Recipient: John Roskelley

The Robert and Miriam Underhill Award

Recognizing the highest level of skill in the mountaineering arts and who, through the application of this skill, courage, and perseverance, has achieved outstanding success.

Recipient: Alex Honnold

Heilprin Citation

Recognizing those who have worked to maintain and strengthen the American Alpine Club and thus further its ability to serve its fundamental purposes.

Recipient: Ellen Lapham

The Robert Hicks Bates Award

Recognizing a young climber who has demonstrated exceptional skill and character in the climbing or mountaineering arts and has outstanding promise for future accomplishment.

Recipient: Margo Hayes

The David R. Brower Award

Recognizing leadership and commitment to preserving mountain regions worldwide.

Recipient: Sally Jewell

About American Alpine Club
The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $100,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org.

 

American Alpine Club & Access Fund Award $10,000 in Grants to Replace Aging Bolts

October 16, 2017, Boulder, CO— The Access Fund and American Alpine Club are pleased to announce the 2017 Anchor Replacement Fund grant awards. Now in its third year, the grant program was launched to address the growing concerns of anchor failure and the access issues that could result from these incidents. This year, we are thrilled to announce funding for eight worthy anchor replacement projects across the country.

Sam’s Throne Anchor Replacement, AR - Arkansas Climbers Coalition
Arkansas Climbers Coalition (ARCC) was awarded funding to replace fixed anchors at Sam’s Throne in Northern Arkansas. ARCC’s volunteers will use the grant funds to replace old hardware and retire tree anchors to preserve and protect the cliff top environment. ARCC is a longtime Access Fund Affiliate and a grassroots climbing non-profit working to steward and protect Arkansas climbing.

Wichita Mountains Anchor Replacment, OK – Wichita Mountains Climbers Coalition
Wichita Mountains Climbers Coalition (WMCC) was awarded funding to replace aging fixed anchors in the Wichita Mountains of Oklahoma, including Quartz Mountain, Mt. Scott, The Narrows, Elk Mountain, The Meadows, Echo Dome, and Lost Dome. The existing hardware was installed 30-40 years ago and includes many Leeper and SMC hangers. This effort will be the largest anchor replacement project undertaken in the Wichitas to date.

Lost Crag, PA - Southwest Pennsylvania Climbers Coalition
Southwest Pennsylvania Climbers Coalition (SWPACC) was awarded funding to replace aging bolts and top-anchors at Lost Crag in Southwest Pennsylvania, using long-lasting glue-in bolts. SWPACC is an Access Fund Affiliate and local climbing organization that leads stewardship and protection of crags and boulderfields in Southwest Pennsylvania.

Hidden Cliff/Skunk Cave, ID - Southern Idaho Climbers Coalition
Southern Idaho Climbers Coalition (SICC) was awarded funding to replace aging fixed anchors at Hidden Cliff/Skunk Cave climbing area. SICC will upgrade routes with bomber, longlasting ½” stainless steel bolts and hardware. SICC is an Access Fund Affiliate local climbing organization working to protect climbing areas in the Twin Falls area.

Tierrany Wall, TN - East Tennessee Climbers’ Coalition
East Tennessee Climbers’ Coalition (ETCC) was awarded funding to replace oudated bolts at the Tierrany Wall, located inside the Obed National Wild and Scenic River area. ETTCC is an Access Fund Affiliate local climbing organization working to steward and protect East Tennessee climbing resources.

Bolton Valley, Smuggler’s Notch, and Wheeler Valley, VT - CRAG- VT
CRAG-VT was awarded funding to replace aging fixed anchors in the Bolton Valley, Smuggler’s Notch, and Wheeler Mountain areas. Many bolts at these areas have been found to be unsuitable for the rock type and have corroded. CRAG-VT will replace these bolts with stainless steel hardware that is suitable for the rock type. CRAG-VT is an Access Fund Affiliate localclimbing organization focusing on protecting climbing resources in Vermont.

Castle Rock State Park, CA - Bay Area Climbers Coalition
Bay Area Climbers Coalition (BACC) was awarded funding to upgrade aging hardware at Castle Rock State Park in California’s South Bay, replacing old button head bolts with stainless steel glue-in anchors and hardware. BACC is an Access Fund Affiliate local climbing organization focused on climbing advocacy and stewardship in the California Bay Area.

Stone Hill, MT - North West Montana Climbers Coalition
North West Montana Climbers Coalition (NWMCC) was awarded funding to replace old hardware at the Stone Hill climbing area in Northwest Montana. In many cases these bolts are over 30 years old and in dire need for replacement. NWMCC is a new local climbing organization that recently attained 501(c)3 status and is seeking to further it’s engagement in climbing access and conservation work in Northwest Montana.



About Access Fund
Access Fund is the national advocacy organization that keeps climbing areas open and conserves the climbing environment. Founded in 1991, Access Fund supports and represents millions of climbers nationwide in all forms of climbing: rock climbing, ice climbing, mountaineering, and bouldering. Six core programs support the mission on national and local levels: climbing policy and advocacy, stewardship and conservation, local support and mobilization, land acquisition and protection, risk management and landowner support, and education. For more information, visit www.accessfund.org.

About American Alpine Club
The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $100,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org.

2018 Annual Benefit Dinner: 40th Anniversary of Americans on K2

October 12, 2017, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club is proud to celebrate the 40-year-anniversary of Americans on the summit of K2 at the 2018 Annual Benefit Dinner. The event will feature Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner as the keynote speaker and will be presented by LOWA and Global Rescue. The Dinner serves as one of the largest annual gatherings within the climbing community, celebrating the history of our sport with some of climbing’s brightest stars.

Kaltenbrunner will speak February 24, 2018, at The Fairmont Copley Plaza Hotel (138 Saint James Avenue, Boston, MA). Kaltenbrunner has been called “a Queen Among Kings” by Outside Magazine. She is the second woman to climb the fourteen 8,000 meter peaks and the first woman to do so without the use of supplementary oxygen or high altitude porters. K2 was the final challenge, which she summited via the lesser climbed North Pillar route.

Additional weekend festivities are open to the public and kick off Friday, February 23 with the Annual Membership Meeting and Climbers' Gathering at Central Rock Gym (74 Acton St, Watertown, MA 02472). The Climbers’ Gathering includes a food truck, libations, and a star-studded climbing competition. Additionally, Saturday morning’s special panel discussions, at the Fairmont Copley Plaza, are open to public. Panelists will discuss topics affecting today’s climbing community and reflect on our community’s past.

The main event of the weekend—the Annual Benefit Dinner—begins at 6pm on the 24th. The evening gathers all generations of climbers for an inspiring evening benefiting the Club’s programs. In addition to Kaltenbrunner's keynote address, attendees will enjoy fine dining, beer and wine, live and silent auctions, and acceptance speeches from this year’s awardees.

The event is expected to sell out and tickets are limited. For more information and to reserve your spot, visit americanalpineclub.org/annual-benefit-dinner. Registration closes on February 14, or when sold out.

About the American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Mountaineering; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages five campgrounds as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $100,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at americanalpineclub.org.

 

American Alpine Club Secures Campground in Rumney, New Hampshire

August 28, 2017, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club (AAC) has purchased a 15 acre campground in Rumney, New Hampshire, within walking distance of Rumney Rocks Climbing Area.

"Rumney is one of the country's finest sport-climbing destinations,” said AAC CEO Phil Powers. “With visitation on the rise, and with more than 22 million Americans and Canadians within weekend striking distance, the American Alpine Club is proud to participate in a sustainable long-term camping solution for this popular spot.”

The Rumney Campground will build upon the success of the current campground and create a place for climbers to stay and for the climbing community to gather near the popular Northeast climbing area. The beautiful 15-acre property sits along the Baker River in Rumney, NH and was previously owned and operated by Tom and Marsha Camara. The AAC will continue the good work of the Camara’s by providing a communal first-come first-serve camping option. Look for a few private reservable sites to be added soon for those wanting a guaranteed spot before arrival. Porta-potties and access to potable water at the barn will remain the same through the end of 2017.

The AAC plans to open the existing barn to campers and climbers as a community space and a place to gather when the weather turns. In addition, the AAC will add bathrooms and showers to the barn.

The campground is located across the street from the Meadows and Parking Lot Wall areas on the east side of the crags. Rumney Rocks, mainly known as a sport climbing destination, has close to 1,000 routes for all ability levels (from 5.3 to 5.15) and also offers traditional climbing and bouldering options.

“With the Rumney Campground now part of the AAC's growing lodging network, we are looking forward to welcoming climbers from around the Northeast and the world to experience this wonderful place, learn, challenge themselves, and meet old and new friends," said Powers.

For information on the Rumney campground and progress updates, visit our website at: https://americanalpineclub.org/rumney-rattlesnake-campground.

 

About American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $80,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org.

American Alpine Club Showcases Utah’s Climbing Resources

American Alpine Club Hosts Utah Delegation for a Day of Climbing

August 9, 2017, Golden, CO— Celebrated Utah athletes Caroline Gleich and Stacy Bare will join the Utah chapter of the American Alpine Club (AAC) on August 9, 2017 to climb with Utah’s Congressional staffers and showcase the state’s rich climbing resources. The state of Utah attracts outdoor enthusiasts from around the globe, particularly rock climbers. Utah’s 54 million acres of public land—especially its National Parks and Monuments—offer premier rock climbing on world-class shale, sandstone, quartzite and granite.

The AAC and athletes will use the day of climbing in Big Cottonwood Canyon as an opportunity to share their experiences on public lands with staffers and to celebrate Utah’s rich outdoor recreation heritage. Climbers will also discuss public lands, the outdoor recreation economy and climbing management in Utah.

“Climbers have a vested interest in policy decisions. Showing up to make our voice heard and to share our passion for climbing is key to the future of the sport,” stated Adam Peters, Utah resident and AAC staff member. “By working together with industry and partner organizations, we form a stronger united front to share the climbing community’s priorities and support of public lands with our representatives.”

Public lands are not only the backbone of outdoor recreation; they also support a healthy economy. According to The Outdoor Recreation Economy Report, 2017 by the Outdoor Industry Association, outdoor recreation in Utah alone generates $12.3 billion in direct consumer spending and 110,000 jobs annually. That’s a lot to celebrate.

About American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $80,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org.

AAC Announces 2017 Research Grant Recipients

May 1, 2017, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club (AAC) is proud to announce the recipients of the 2017 Research Grants, powered by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy and supported by the following endowments: Lara-Karena Bitenieks Kellogg Memorial Fund, Scott Fischer Memorial Fund, Arthur K. Gilkey Memorial Fund and the Bedayn Research Fund. The AAC Research Grants program supports scientific endeavors in mountain environments around the world. As climbers, we have a responsibility to understand how our outdoor resources are being affected in changing world. Part of the AAC’s mission is to respect and support the areas we enjoy, one of the most important ways to do that is by funding research to better understand such environments.

A big thanks to our corporate partners and to our Research Grant Committee members (listed below). Congratulations to our 2017 Research Grant recipients:

Kate McHugh – $1,500
Wilderness Rock Climbing Indicators and Climbing Management Implications in the National Park System, Grand Canyon National Park and Joshua Tree National Park
Kate McHugh is pursuing a Masters in Applied Geospatial Analysis, Geography, Planning, and Recreation at the University of Arizona. She is conducting a study that will determine what variables or indicators should be monitored and measured for climbing management strategies in National Park Service wilderness.

Cristian Rios – $1,000
Ecology and conservation of Polylepis ecosystem and its bird community, Peru
Cristian Rios is a Peruvian Ph.D. student at Cornell University in Conservation Science, entering his fourth year of field work. He is investigating the possible link of habitat loss and habitat fragmentation to the population declines of several threatened bird species in the Polylepsis forests of Huascaran National Park.

Rebecca Finger – $1,000
Limits to shrub expansion in a warmer Arctic, Greenland
Rebecca Finger is a Ph.D. student and NSF Fellow in Ecology at Dartmouth. She is examining the response of shrubs in the Arctic tundra to global warming and its effect on the permafrost over the past 50 years. In addition to conducting research, she will spend some of her time in Greenland helping teach and mentor local high school youth.

Kaitlyn Hanley – $1,000
The persistence of American pika in the Greater Yellowstone Region under a warmer future climate, Montana and Wyoming
Kaitlyn Hanley is a Masters student in Biological Sciences at Clemson. She is investigating both how and why pikas are surviving at lower elevations than previously reported in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

Nathalie Chardon – $750
Disturbance impacts on alpine plant populations at elevational and climatic limits, Colorado
Nathalie Chardon is a Ph.D. candidate in Environmental Studies at University of Colorado, Boulder. She is researching human impacts on biodiversity competition at limits of moss campion’s range, (e.g. hiker disturbance and trampling, and how effects change with elevation).

Chris Cosgrove – $750
Open-source automated weather stations for wireless sensor networks in high altitude/latitude environments, Oregon and Alaska
Chris Cosgrove is a 1st year Ph.D. student at Oregon State University’s Mountain Hydroclimatology group. He is developing and testing a prototype open-source automated weather station that will be integrated into a long-range wireless sensor network. If successful, it should be robust enough to endure winter-long deployment in a remote backcountry site.

Jess Gilbert – $500
Assessing the impact of anthropogenic activities on high altitude biodiversity in Huascaran National Park, Peru
Jess Gilbert is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences at Texas A&M University. She is exploring the spatial use of habitat by mammalian carnivores in both ‘pristine’ environments and areas affected by livestock grazing or tourism activities in Huascaran National Park, Peru.

Emily Schultz – $500
The importance of within-patch heterogeneity for metapopulation dynamics of a high elevation pine, Oregon
Emily Shultz is a Ph.D. candidate and NSF fellow in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Rice University. She is developing models predicting the heterogeneity of whitebark pine and impact of heterogeneity on resilience. This research elevates the predictive analysis possible for metapopulations of the endangered conifer.

Win McLaughlin – $500
Initiation and timing of uplift of the Tien Shan, Kyrgyzstan
Win McLaughlin is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Oregon. He will conduct field work to collect and compare fossils and rock cores from two basins in the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan to constrain the timing and rate of their uplift.

Anya Tyson – $500
The Clark’s Nutcracker Citizen Science Project: Engaging young adventurers in research and conservation, Wyoming
Anya Tyson is a Masters student in the Conservation Ecology and Field Naturalist Program at University of Vermont and the coordinator of the Clark’s Nutcracker Citizen Science Project. She is an active science communicator who specializes in training instructors from NOLS, Teton Science Schools, and other organizations on how to educate their students about the whitebark pine ecosystem.

Daniel Winkler – $500
Biodiversity collapse: how a keystone species mediates biodiversity of Ecuadorian alpine areas responding to climate change, Ecuador
Daniel Winkler is a Ph.D. candidate in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at University of California, Irvine. He is conducting research to test if climate change-induced range shifts of the vulnerable X. rigidum (a keystone nurse plant species) have occurred on the dry western slopes in the rain shadow of Mount Chimborazo, Ecuador.

Alison Criscitiello – $500
Histories of Arctic climate and environmental contaminants from a shallow ice core, Grant Ice Cap, Ellesmere Island, Canada
Alison Criscitiello is a post-doctoral researcher in the Cryosphere Climate Research Group at the University of Calgary, Canada and the Technical Director of the Canadian Ice Core Archive at the University of Alberta. Her research focuses on reconstructing climate and sea ice histories of the Arctic Ocean, as well as examining the presence of pollutants through time.

Rachael Mallon – $500
Phylogeography of Snow Algae Communities in the Pacific Northwest, California, Oregon, Washington
Rachael Mallon is a Masters student in Biology at Western Washington University. She is investigating the effects of snow algae on accelerating melting of snow pack in the Western United States from the Sierra Nevada through the Cascade Range.

Peter Billman – $250
Understanding how changing snowpacks and water availability affect patterns of distributional change in the American pika
Peter Billman is beginning a Ph.D. program at Montana State University. He is investigating the effects of water-availability on the windward (west-facing) and leeward (east-facing) sides in several mountain ranges on the location and distribution of the American pika.

AAC Research Grant Selection Committee

  • Sarah Vail, Committee Chair
  • Danika Gilbert
  • Louis Reichardt
  • Matt Hepp
  • Katie Rose Fischer-Price

With support from: Maria Povec, Research Grant Coordinator, AAC staff and Jonathan Oulton, AAC Policy Program intern

About the American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $80,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at americanalpineclub.org.

Elite Climbers Join American Alpine Club and Access Fund on Capitol Hill to Advocate for Public Lands

American Alpine Club and Access Fund Host Second Annual Climb the Hill Event

April 26, 2017, Golden, CO— Celebrated climbers Conrad Anker, Tommy Caldwell, Sasha DiGiulian, Alex Honnold, Kai Lightner and Libby Sauter will join the American Alpine Club and Access Fund to represent the climbing community in Washington D.C. for Climb the Hill, an event sponsored by Adidas. On May 11, 2017, both organizations, alongside a team of elite climbers and outdoor industry partners, will meet with Congressional representatives and policymakers to advocate for public lands, outdoor recreation and improved climbing management.

The team of rock climbing advocates will share their experiences on public lands with members of Congress and top federal land agency officials. They will also advocate for appropriate funding levels and balanced land management policies that support outdoor recreation and conservation.  

“Climbers have a vested interest in what happens in D.C., and showing up to make our voice heard is key to the future of the sport,” stated Brad Brooks, AAC Board member and Policy Committee member. “By working together with industry and partner organizations, we form a stronger united front to voice the climbing community’s concerns to our representatives.”

Access Fund estimates that about 60 percent of all rock climbing areas in the US are located on federal public lands. The American Alpine Club and Access Fund will advocate to protect The Antiquities Act, as well as voice their opposition to proposals that would diminish the value of federal recreation assets and sell or transfer federal public lands to states or private entities.

“Threats to federal public lands constitute the greatest threat to rock climbing we’ve ever faced. The most iconic climbing areas in the country are found on our public lands, and our mission is to make sure that these climbing areas are protected and conserved for future generations,” said Erik Murdock, Access Fund policy director.

“Public lands are not only the backbone of outdoor recreation, they also support a healthy economy,” said Brooks. According to The Outdoor Recreation Economy Report, 2017 by the Outdoor Industry Association, outdoor recreation (now included in the GDP), generates $887 billion in consumer spending and 7.6 million jobs annually. This sum nearly amounts to what Americans spend on pharmaceuticals and motor vehicles combined.

For more information on how you can support the Climb the Hill campaign, visit climbthehill.org.

About American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $80,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org.

About Access Fund

Access Fund is the national advocacy organization that keeps climbing areas open and conserves the climbing environment. Founded in 1991, Access Fund supports and represents millions of climbers nationwide in all forms of climbing: rock climbing, ice climbing, mountaineering, and bouldering. Six core programs support the mission on national and local levels: climbing policy and advocacy, stewardship and conservation, local support and mobilization, land acquisition and protection, risk management and landowner support, and education. Access Fund is the largest US climbing advocacy organization with over 15,000 members and 100 local affiliates. Access Fund advocates for climbers at the local and national levels, and maintains active Memorandums of Understanding with the National Park Service, US Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management. For more information, visit www.accessfund.org.

AAC Announces 2017 Excellence in Climbing Award Recipients

Registration is now open for the Excellence in Climbing Awards celebration.

April 13, 2017, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club is proud to announce our Excellence in Climbing Awards celebration, presented by Adidas Outdoor. The fundraising event celebrates teamwork and will honor the 2017 Hall of Mountaineering Excellence Awardees: Sean Patrick, Dave Morton and Melissa Arnot Reid, Sean and Timmy O’Neill, and former AAC President Doug Walker.

This prestigious award is given to those who have made lasting contributions both on and off the mountain. These climbers have inspired a legacy for future climbers, positively impacted the environment, and advanced the fields of science and medicine, all while accomplishing incredible climbing feats.

Learn more about this year’s Hall of Mountaineering Excellence inductees:

Sean Patrick (1951 - 2009) - For being a recognized leader in the cancer treatment and research community. Sean Patrick spread awareness, compassion and inspiration to other women by founding HERA Ovarian Cancer Foundation, all while continuing to climb.

David Morton and Melissa Arnot Reid - For starting The Juniper Fund, which provides assistance to individuals, families, and communities in underserved countries adversely affected by their work for the mountain-based adventure industry.

Sean and Timmy O’Neill - For their work with Paradox Sports, a community that provides inspiration, opportunities and specialized adaptive equipment so that anyone is able to be an active participant in human-powered sports.

Doug Walker (1950 - 2015) - Former AAC President, committed conservationist, and a true climber’s climber, Doug Walker dedicated his life to the preservation of the outdoors he loved so dearly through his service on a variety of boards and generous giving.

In addition, the American Alpine Club will present the 2017 Cutting Edge Award to recipients Graham Zimmerman and Scott Bennett for their first ascent on the Southwest Ridge of K6 West, a 7,040-meter (23,097-foot) peak in the Karakoram.

Each year, the AAC recognizes one climbing team who, with the aid of an AAC climbing grant, demonstrated excellence in climbing, upheld the values of the American Alpine Club, and acted in a manner befit a world-class ambassador to American climbing both domestically and abroad.The team was supported by the American Alpine Club’s Lyman Spitzer Cutting Edge Grant.

The teamwork themed celebration will be held on Saturday June 3, 2017 at the Westin located at 1672 Lawrence Street, Denver, CO 80202. The evening includes presentations by award winners and attendees will enjoy a cocktail reception, live and silent auctions, libations, and food. An after party featuring live music by 80’s cover band, The Goonies, drinks, and gear giveaway will take place directly after the dinner also at Westin.

All proceeds benefit The American Alpine Club Library and The Bradford Washburn American Mountaineering Museum.

Tickets are very limited. For more information about the weekend activities and to reserve your spot, call (303) 384-0110 or visit americanalpineclub.org/excellence. Registration closes on May 29, or when sold out.

 

About The American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $80,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at americanalpineclub.org.

 

Four North American Mountain Clubs Unite for Climbing Education and Public Policy

February 13, 2017, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club, Colorado Mountain Club, the Mazamas, and The Mountaineers are joining forces to promote improvements in climbing safety, coordinate stewardship and advocate for climbing areas in the United States.

The four organizations have formally agreed to a working partnership to develop and implement shared standards for climbing and related mountain sports. The standards would apply to volunteer instructors and remain consistent across the country.

The partners represent four of the largest and longest-standing organizations dedicated to conserving mountain environments, providing quality outdoor education, and advocating for climbers throughout America. As the United States’ representative to the UIAA, the American Alpine Club will be leading and facilitating the work, and will ensure that these new standards are internationally recognized by the global climbing community.

“We all care about introducing the next generation to the great outdoors and we have a responsibility to do it safely and effectively,” American Alpine Club CEO Phil Powers said. “This partnership, with four prominent U.S. mountain clubs, promotes the AAC’s vision of a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. In the vertical world, combinations of seemingly insignificant errors add up quickly—competence matters.”

In the past decade the popularity of climbing in the U.S. has increased dramatically, creating a demand for quality climbing instruction. “These standards aim to ensure that the entire climbing community benefits from better training and will ultimately make climbing more accessible to everyone,” Mazamas Executive Director Lee Davis said.

“The Colorado Mountain Club is thrilled to be formally partnering with other influential mountain clubs to assist in the development and dissemination of new mountain skills training standards in America,” CMC Executive Director Scott Robson said. “By coordinating our efforts nationally, we raise the bar in regards to the quality of education that organizations like the CMC provide and we look forward to the positive impact these standards will have on our members and all of those who recreate in the mountains for years to come.”

“We have the opportunity to extend the impacts of our organizations by working together,” The Mountaineers CEO Tom Vogl said.

In the future, the partner organizations plan to examine ways to collaborate on issues of public policy, technology, membership, benefits and services, and other items of shared interest.

 

About The American Alpine Club:

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Mountaineering; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $100,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at americanalpineclub.org.

 

About the Colorado Mountain Club:

The Colorado Mountain Club is the state’s leading organization dedicated to adventure, recreation, conservation and education. Founded in 1912, the CMC acts as a gateway to the mountains for novices and experts alike, offering an array of year-round activities, events and schools centered on outdoor recreation. The Club comprises 13 regional groups across the state to serve the local needs of its members and partners. To ensure the continued enjoyment of Colorado’s pristine places, the CMC also leads efforts to protect wild and public lands with its conservation and stewardship programs. The Club publishes a quarterly magazine, Trail & Timberline, and operates a press with 50 current titles. No other organization in the Intermountain West employs such a strong or broad approach to connecting people with the Rocky Mountain landscape.

 

About the Mazamas:

The Mazamas promotes mountaineering, responsible recreation, and conservation through outdoor education, youth outreach, and advocacy programs. Founded on the summit of Mt. Hood, and headquartered in Portland, Oregon, the Mazamas has been working to represent and support everyone who loves to play in and protect the mountains of the Pacific Northwest for more than 120 years. The Mazamas operate one of the largest centralized mountaineering training schools in the country, graduating more than 500 people per year with basic to intermediate level climbing skills. The Mazamas also have a robust grants program that distributes more than $50,000 per year through conservation, research, and expedition grants. Members enjoy priority access to programs, domestic rescue insurance, and the opportunity to apply to our larger grants, including the $10,000 annual Bob Wilson Expedition Grant. Additional programs include classes in outdoor leadership, expedition planning, nordic skiing, ski mountaineering, wilderness first aid, and a variety of outdoor skill building courses. You can learn more about the Mazamas and start your adventure here: mazamas.org

 

About the Mountaineers:

The Mountaineers is an organization dedicated to helping people explore, conserve, learn about and enjoy the lands and waters of the Pacific Northwest and beyond. Founded in 1906, the 12,000-member Mountaineers community offers thousands of volunteer-led courses, activities, and events to connect young and old, novice and veteran, to the power and wonder of the natural world. The Mountaineers’ advocacy program is Washington’s leading voice for protecting the wild places where we play. Mountaineers Books expands passion for the outdoors internationally through award-winning publications, including instructional guides, adventure narratives, and conservation photography. Learn more at www.mountaineers.org.