2019 Research Grant Recipients Announced

March 26, 2019, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club (AAC) is proud to announce the recipients of the 2019 Research Grants, powered by the National Renewable Energy Lab and Ridgeline Venture Law, with support from Four Points, Kavu, and the following endowments: Arthur K. Gilkey Memorial Fund and the Bedayn Research Fund. This year, the Club is awarding more than $16,000 to researchers pursuing scientific endeavors in mountain environments around the world.

“We are proud to support these valuable research projects,” said AAC Policy Manager Taylor Luneau. “The work that young climber scientists are doing in the mountains reveal important findings on many aspects of climbing such as a changing climate and stewardship and land management strategies for healthy and resilient ecosystems. Ultimately, we hope this research can be used to inform climate and land use legislation to the benefit of all climbers and outdoor recreationists.”

Megan Behnke - $1,500

Smoky ice: How have alpine and glacier tourism impacted Juneau Icefield biogeochemistry?

Megan Behnke is a Ph.D. student in Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences at Florida State University. She plans to travel to the Juneau Icefield, in coastal Southeast Alaska, to study the impact of tourism on the local icefield-to-ocean ecosystem.

Scott Braddock - $1,500

Climate impacts on the glaciers and wildlife of the Southern Patagonian Icefield, Chile

Scott Braddock is a Ph.D. student in Earth and Climate Sciences at the University of Maine. His research focuses on identifying the dominant mechanism of glacier acceleration in the Southern Patagonia Icefield, and retreat impacts on glacier stability and biodiversity in Bernard O’Higgins National Park. 

Jesse Bryant - $1,500

A policy science inquiry into the cultural conflict in Ten Sleep, WY

Jesse Bryant is a Masters student in Environmental Management at Yale. His research aims to systematically chart a comprehensive picture of the resource questions in Ten Sleep by employing an interdisciplinary multi-method approach called the policy science framework. Ultimately, this study may act as a guide for national climbing advocacy groups and local groups in Ten Sleep to clarify the source of apparent “problems,” discover common interests with locals, and build a more collaborative climbing management strategy in Ten Sleep Canyon.

Donovan Dennis - $1,270

Mountain stability in a warming world: investigating environmental controls on frost weathering in cold regions

Donovan Dennis is a Ph.D. student in Earth Science at the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences in Potsdam, Germany. Dennis’ research will focus on investigating the magnitude of weathering on recently exposed (de-glaciated) bedrock experiencing different climate conditions. The Juneau Icefield (JI) is an ideal setting to test these effects, as it has an abundance of recently exposed bedrock and, additionally, a strong climate gradient across the east-west axis of the icefield. The proposed work on the JI will be carried out in collaboration with the Juneau Icefield Research Program (JIRP).

Juliann Allison - $1,157

The role of climbers' identities, ethics and activism in conserving and preserving sandstone climbing areas

Juliann Allison is an Associate Professor and Department Chair of the University of California, Riverside, Gender & Sexuality Studies department. Her research will focus on examining climbers’ identities as sources of environmental ethics, and climbing practices that are most likely to motivate their participation in individual and organized conservation programs to support the long-term ecological viability of sandstone climbing areas.

Georgia Harrison - $1,300

Impact of rock-climbing disturbance and microhabitat characteristics on cliff-face vegetation communities of the Linville Gorge Wilderness Area

Georgia Harrison is a Master’s student in Biology at Appalachian State University. Her team looks to determine the relative influence of rock-climbing activity, cliff-face microtopography, and microclimate on the cliff-face vegetation communities of the Linville Gorge Wilderness Area (LGWA). In addition to improving current plant inventory records, their study will provide land managers with information regarding the potential impacts of recreational rock climbing on cliff-face plant communities in the LGWA.

Dara Miles - $683

Golden eagle nest monitoring in Boulder Canyon rock climbing areas (in collaboration with the National Forest Service)

Dara Miles is the Director of the Boulder Climbing Community’s (BCC) Eagle Monitoring Program. In collaboration with the National Forest Service, BCC works with local climber-volunteers to monitor Golden Eagle nests in Boulder Canyon, CO. This grant will fund additional equipment to assist volunteers and the Forest Service in their ongoing monitoring of the eagles and their habitats in a popular climbing area.

Wade Parker - $1,500

A floristic survey of Buckeye Knob bouldering area: inventory and climber education

Wade Parker is the Vice President of the Carolina Climbers Coalition (CCC), a Local Climbing Organization based in Raleigh, NC. The CCC, working with two local cliff ecologists and climbers, will conduct a floristic inventory at the Buckeye Knob bouldering area in Watauga County, NC. This information will be used to educate all visitors and foster greater stewardship in support of a healthy, resilient, local ecosystem.

Jeffrey Perala-Dewey - $1,500

Climbing with contaminants: quantifying atmospheric deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) into the snowpack of Utah's Wasatch Mountains

Jeffrey Perala-Dewey is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Utah State University. This study will benchmark the level of PAH deposition into the Wasatch Range. Determination of both the magnitude of alpine contamination as well as the type of contaminants found in the Wasatch Range will provide a valuable starting point for further research in the region. Results will indicate whether these contaminations may be ecologically significant during spring snow melt.

Brianna Rick - $1,500

Rock glaciers as climate resilient cold-water reservoirs in alpine basins

Brianna Rick is a Ph.D. student in Geosciences at Colorado State University. Her research focuses on quantifying the volume of ice within the Lake Agnes rock glacier in Colorado, a permafrost feature containing internal ice layers more resilient to climate change. This research will aid in understanding current and potential future stream flow contributions of rock glaciers.

Wilmer Esteban Sanchez Rodriguez - $1,350

Impact of the black carbon on the melting of Vallunaraju Glacier in the Cordillera Blanca

Wilmer Esteban Sanchez Rodriguez is a researcher working with the American Climbers Science Program in Peru. Their work with this project proposes to estimate the melting of the Vallunaraju Glacier in the Cordillera Blanca as a result of black carbon particle distribution and solar radiation across the glacier.

Anais Zimmer - $1,430

Future of periglacial landscape: alpine ecosystems and deglaciation in the tropical Andes and French Alps

Anais Zimmer is a Ph.D. student at the Department of Geography and Environment at the University of Texas at Austin. The long-term goal of this project is to examine the complex reciprocity between climate, high alpine ecosystems, and human systems, through a comprehensive reconstruction of the dynamics of communities and of species assemblages after glacial retreat. Her project will focus equally on ecological processes and human systems to sustain livelihood activities and downstream services.

Learn more about the AAC Research Grants: americanalpineclub.org/research-grants

About American Alpine Club
The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world’s most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world’s leading climbing library and country’s leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers’ Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and gives $100,000+ annually toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org

UIAA World Cup Ice Climbing Finals Draws Record-Breaking Live Crowds and Online Viewing in Denver, CO

February 25, 2019, Golden, CO—On its inaugural stage in downtown Denver, CO, the 2019 UIAA World Cup Ice Climbing Finals broke international records as the largest-ever audience for a World Cup Ice Climbing event and received a record number of online views with hundreds of thousands more tuning in to watch the competition’s live stream.

The two-day World Cup Ice Climbing Finals held in Civic Center Park, February 23 - 24, recorded a live crowd of more than 25,000, making the Denver World Cup Finals not only the most watched World Cup Ice Climbing event in the Tour’s history, but also one of the most well-spectated climbing events of all time.

Hosted and produced by the American Alpine Club, the event’s attendance more than doubled the original expectations. American Alpine Club CEO, Phil Powers, had never witnessed such a massive audience for a climbing event: “We exceeded our attendance goals for the full weekend before the end of the first day. People were blown away by the athleticism and intensity of the competition — I have no doubt many new ice climbers were created this weekend.”

Located in Denver’s historic Civic Center Park, the competition was hosted in an urban setting that provided a more diverse audience in comparison to the Tour’s regular stops in mountain towns. Sunday evening’s Lead Finals had an electric atmosphere as just two men topped out on the 60-ft structure: 21-year-old Yannick Glatthard of Switzerland and Nikolai Kuzovlev of Russia. Glatthard, dubbed ‘Swiss Air’ for his flying, daring style, topped out 11 seconds faster than Kuzovlev, claiming the Gold with a dramatic victory leap off the top of the structure in front of an enthralled crowd. The women’s lead final left no less exhilaration with Maria Tolokonina of Russia nudging out Woonseon Shin of South Korea by a mere touch of the eleventh (and final) hold.

The big story for Saturday evening’s Speed Finals was Canada’s David Bouffard, who became the first North American to claim a World Cup medal with silver. Nikolai Kuzovlev of Russia took Gold with a blistering fast climb of 6.48 seconds. Maria Tolokonina of Russia also took Gold in the Women’s Speed Final in a big weekend medal sweep.

For complete results and World Cup Tour recap, please visit: https://www.theuiaa.org/ice-climbing/

COMPETITION PHOTOS: http://bit.ly/2BSFQBL 

About American Alpine Club
The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world’s most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world’s leading climbing library and country’s leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers’ Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and gives $100,000+ annually toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org

The Live Your Dream Grant Encourages Climbers of all Abilities to Dream Big

$50,000 in Grant Awards Available for Climbers of all Skill Levels

February 5, 2019, Golden, CO—The AAC in partnership with The North Face is pleased to open the 2019 Live Your Dream Grants to climbers of all ages, all experience levels, and all climbing disciplines. Anyone with an itch for adventure will have until March 31, 2019 to submit an application online, outlining an ambitious but achievable personal climbing / ski mountaineering objective.

Since 2012, the American Alpine Club and The North Face have enabled nearly 600 adventures large and small with nearly $275,000 in financial support. Live Your Dream Grants are unique in that the main objective is to help ordinary climbers improve their skills and to enable life-changing adventure.

For the 2019 grant cycle, the AAC and The North Face will give away $50,000 in grant money ranging from $200 - $1,000 per individual. There is an application fee of $5 for members of the AAC and $20 for non-members and AAC membership is required only if a grant is awarded.

Kalli Schumacher, a 2018 Live Your Dream Grant recipient, used her grant money to climb in multiple mountain ranges across the United States over the course of a single summer. Reflecting on the experience, Kalli says, “I think Live Your Dream’s biggest impact on my progression was to unravel the mystique behind the mountains. As a woman of color and a mountaineer, promoting inclusivity across race, gender, economic status, and whatever barrier-to-entry someone might experience is very important to me, and it's exactly what Live Your Dream does. This grant gives opportunity where it might not otherwise exist.”

The Live Your Dream Grant is designed for everything from bouldering to big walls, alpinism to ski mountaineering, peak bagging to bolt clipping and everything in between. What’s most important is to demonstrate personal progression: be it transitioning out of the gym or establishing a first ascent in the greater ranges, the purpose of this grant is to support and promote unforgettable experiences for those who love climbing.

Applications are currently being accepted for the 2019 Live Your Dream Grant: 

americanalpineclub.org/live-your-dream-grant/

About the American Alpine Club


The American Alpine Club has a storied legacy of funding climbing, conservation, and research projects in North America and around the world. AAC grants have been responsible for encouraging thousands of climbers to dream big and push their limits; for pioneering hundreds of cutting-edge new routes of remote and major peaks around the world; for improving infrastructure at climbing areas across the country; and funding scientific research expeditions that have contributed valuable information to our understanding of the worlds mountain ecosystems. The AAC gives more than $150,000 annually to projects that support the betterment of the climbing community and environment. Join us at: americanalpineclub.org

2019 Cutting Edge Recipients Announced

January 29, 2019, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club (AAC) is pleased to announce this year’s recipients of the 2019 Cutting Edge Grant. The Cutting Edge Grant continues the Club’s 100 year tradition of supporting climbing athletes in pursuit of world-class climbing and mountaineering objectives.

The Cutting Edge Grant seeks to fund individuals planning expeditions to remote areas featuring unexplored mountain ranges, unclimbed peaks, difficult new routes, first free ascents, or similar world-class pursuits. Objectives featuring a low-impact style and leave-no-trace mentality are looked upon with favor. For the 2019 grant cycle, the AAC awarded $20,000 to three recipients:

Sam Hennessey ($8,000) to attempt the North Face of Chamlang (7300m) in the Eastern Himalaya of Nepal. Rob Smith, Seth Timpano, Michael Gardner, and grant-winner Sam Hennessey will attempt the unclimbed North Face this coming Autumn, in alpine style. The north face is an impressive feature, rising nearly 2000m directly to the summit ridge. The face has received attention almost yearly for the last decade, with no teams making serious progress due to poor climbing conditions, bad weather, or both. Hennessey has climbed technical routes all over the world, from the Himalaya to Patagonia.  

Chantel Astorga ($6,000) to attempt Pumari Chhish South (7350m) in Pakistan's Hispar Karakoram. Astorga and Anne Gilbert Chase will attempt the unclimbed 2700m South Face in mixed climbing conditions and with an alpine style approach. In 2018, Astorga and Chase completed the first female ascent of Denali’s Slovak Direct (5.9X M6 W16+, 9,000’). They also completed the first ascent of the unclimbed SW face of Mount Nilkantha in India, with Jason Thompson. 

Chris Wright ($6,000) to attempt an unclimbed 7000m peak in the Eastern Karakoram Range, Pakistan. The grant will fund expedition expenses for Wright and Graham Zimmerman. They will be joined by Mark Richey and Steve Swenson in attempting the first ascent of the peak in alpine style. Wright, Zimmerman, and Swenson previously attempted the peak but were unsuccessful due to uncooperative weather. Wright describes it as, “A stunning, oft-tried, yet unclimbed granite monster in a seldom-visited valley in the heart of the Karakoram...it is undoubtedly one of the most compelling undone peaks of the greater ranges.” Wright has been climbing for 17 years, including 11 expeditions to technical routes in the greater ranges. He holds numerous first ascents in Alaska, India, Nepal, Norway, and more.

The Cutting Edge Grant is supported in part by Global Rescue, the world’s leading provider of integrated travel risk and evacuation memberships. CEG recipients are additionally awarded a one-year, full Global Rescue Membership—an upgrade to the standard AAC rescue coverage. Upgraded benefits include: $500,000 of rescue evacuation; repatriation back to the US; deployed Global Rescue Personnel; and more—a service intended to help AAC members climb hard and return home safely.

The AAC has inspired and supported cutting-edge climbing achievements for over 100 years.  Applications for the Cutting Edge Grant are accepted each year from October 1st through November 30th. 

For more information, visit: americanalpineclub.org/cutting-edge-grant

For more information on Global Rescue and their memberships, visit: globalrescue.com

About American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $100,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at americanalpineclub.org.

 

2019 Climbing Awards Announced by the American Alpine Club

America’s Leading Climbing Awards Honor Jim Donini, Michael Kennedy, Tom Hornbein, Kate Rutherford, and Jeremy Jones among others

Golden, CO, December 17, 2018—The American Alpine Club (AAC) is pleased to announce the winners of the 2019 Climbing Awards honoring the most impactful climbers and conservationists within the North American climbing community. Among this year’s award honorees are climbing legends Tom Hornbein, Michael Kennedy, and Jim Donini, and present-day activists and trend-setters including Jeremy Jones, Kate Rutherford, and Brette Harrington.

The Annual Climbing Awards, presented by The American Alpine Club, are the longest running

and most prestigious awards honoring climbing and mountain conservation in North America. The Annual Climbing Awards will be presented at the AAC Annual Dinner Weekend, March 8-10, 2019 in San Francisco. The event’s keynote speaker is Colin Haley, who will speak to the triumphs and tragedies of speed climbing.

Phil Powers, American Alpine Club CEO, said of the 2019 Awards, “The Annual Climbing Awards are unique in that they recognize both lifetime achievements and those who represent the future. Look at the list; from climbers who are changing the climbing landscape right now to icons from our history, we will hear some amazing stories." 

Celebrating some of the greatest mountaineers of Golden Age of American climbing, Jim Donini, Michael Kennedy will receive a prestigious Honorary Membership for their “lasting and highly significant impact on the advancement of the climbing craft,” and Tom Hornbein, famous for the 1963 first ascent of Everest’s infamous West Ridge, will receive the 2019 Heilprin Citation for his lifelong work to “maintain and strengthen the American Alpine Club.”

For the second year in a row, a female climber will receive the The Robert Hicks Bates Award which honors young climbers who show “outstanding promise for future accomplishment.” Brette Harrington, a 26-year-old climber, is perhaps best known for the first free solo of 2,500-ft Chiaro di Luna (5.11a) in Patagonia, but is also an accomplished trad climber with several 5.13+ routes to her name. Past Bates Award winners have included Alex Honnold, Chris Sharma, Tommy Caldwell, Steph Davis, Hayden Kennedy, Colin Haley (the 2019 Keynote speaker), Sasha DiGiulian, and Margo Hayes. 

Kate Rutherford is set to receive the Underhill Award in recognition of a fantastic and inspiring climbing career. Rutherford was singled out by the AAC selection committee due to her impressive list of climbing accomplishments worldwide and a number of notable first all-female free ascents, including FreeRider (5.13a) on El Capitan, the Moonlight Buttress (5.12d) in Zion, and the North Pillar of Fitzroy.

Legendary big mountain snowboarder, Jeremy Jones, will be recognized for his conservation leadership to bring attention to climate change as it affects the mountain community. Jones has become an unrelenting champion to fight climate change and share his experiences of receding glaciers and changing mountain landscapes using his podium as an athlete. In 2013 Jones was named National Geographic Adventurer of the Year, and has been called a “Champion of Change” by President Obama.

The American Alpine Club is also pleased to recognize the selflessness and courage of a Polish climbing team who redirected from their first winter ascent of K2 to rescue another team caught at 26,660 ft on Pakistan’s Nanga Parbat. The team, comprised of Dennis Urubko, Adam Bielecki, Jaroslaw Botor, and Piotrek Tomala, climbed through the night in treacherous conditions to rescue a French climber, Elisabeth Revol.


2019 American Alpine Club Annual Dinner Weekend

https://americanalpineclub.org/annual-benefit-dinner

Date: 

March 8-10, 2019

Location: 

The Westin St. Francis

2295 Harrison Street

San Francisco, CA 94110

Keynote Speaker:

Colin Haley on the triumphs and tragedies of speed climbing.

Additional Festivities:

Send ‘n’ Social celebrity climbing comp, climbing clinics, panel discussions, and more! Check the website for the full weekend schedule. 

Ticket Information:

The 2019 Annual Dinner Weekend is expected to sell out and tickets are limited. For more information and to reserve your spot, visit americanalpineclub.org/annual-benefit-dinner. Registration closes on February 14, or when sold out.

2019 Climbing Award Recipients

https://americanalpineclub.org/abd-awards

Honorary Membership

For having had a lasting and significant impact on the advancement of climbing.

Recipient: Jim Donini and Michael Kennedy

The Robert and Miriam Underhill Award

Recognizing the highest level of climbing skill, courage, and perseverance, with outstanding success.

Recipient: Kate Rutherford

Heilprin Citation

Recognizing those who have worked to maintain and strengthen the American Alpine Club.

Recipient: Thomas Hornbein, MD

The Robert Hicks Bates Award

Recognizing a young climber with outstanding promise.

Recipient: Brette Harrington

The David R. Brower Award

Recognizing leadership and commitment to preserving mountain regions worldwide.

Recipient: Jeremy Jones

The David A Sowles Award

Recognizing unselfish devotion at personal risk or sacrifice of a major objective, in going to the assistance of fellow climbers imperiled in the mountains.

Recipients: Dennis Urubko, Adam Bielecki, Jaroslaw Botor, and Piotrek Tomala

The H. Adams Carter Literary Award (Presented June 1 at the Excellence in Climbing event in Denver)

Recognizing excellence in climbing literature.

Recipient: Kelly Cordes

About The American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Mountaineering; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages five campgrounds as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $80,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at americanalpineclub.org.

American Alpine Club Announces 2019 US Team for the UIAA World Cup Ice Climbing Competition in Denver, CO

Golden, CO, December 5, 2018—The American Alpine Club (AAC), America’s oldest non-profit organization for climbers, is thrilled to announced the 2019 USA World Cup Ice Climbing Team. The team of 21 male and female athletes is set to compete in the upcoming UIAA World Cup Ice Climbing Tour, and 18 will compete here in Denver, CO. February 23 – 24, 2019.

 The AAC led the application process and final selection of the 2019 USA Team. Criteria was based on national rankings from recent competitive ice climbing seasons and events, and a preference for athletes who compete in cross-disciplinary ice competition (e.g. athletes that compete in both the Difficulty (Lead) and Speed competitions). The AAC also provided “developmental” spots on the team for less experienced competition climbers who demonstrate exceptional talent and commitment to the sport. Equal team positions were available for men and women in the performance (6) and developmental (2) categories.

 The final 2019 USA Team consists of 21 adults and 10 youth members.Phil Powers, CEO at the AAC said “These athletes represent the cutting edge of one of the more wild versions of the climbing craft. I am astounded every time I witness their gymnastics and delicate skill all performed far off the ground with ice axes and crampons.”

The 2019 event is the first time the Ice Climbing World Tour has come to Denver, Colorado and the first time a World Cup Finals event has been held in the USA. The weekend event will be held in Denver’s Civic Center Park and is free to the public. The ice climbing competition will take place over two days with qualifying rounds on Sat, Feb 23, and semi-finals and overall finals on Sun, Feb 24. The event is expected to attract over 200 athletes from 21 countries around the world to compete for the overall World Cup in both Difficulty and Speed categories.

Competition ice climbing combines formidable over-hanging walls of ice with artful technique and sheer power. In the lead discipline, ice climbers require great technique, tactical mastery and nerves of steel to execute complex moves in seemingly improbable positions dozens of feet above the ground. The speed discipline is almost a vertical take on the 100m sprint in the sport of athletics. In 2014, competitive ice climbing debuted as an exhibition sport at the Sochi Winter Olympics and is hopeful for a full-scale Olympic debut in the near future.

 

2019 USA World Cup Ice Climbing Team: 

Denver World Cup Finals:

Mens Lead:

Tyler Kempney

Thomas Gehrlein

Aaron Montgomery

Grant Kleeves

Kevin Lindlau

Wesley Fowler

Carter Stritch

Troy Anger

 

Womens Lead: 

Corey Buhay

Catalina Shirley

Claire Poppendeck

Mikayla Tougas

Angela Tomczik

Angela Limbach

Kendra Stritch

Mens Speed:

Tyler Kempney

Thomas Gehrlein

Kevin Lindlau

Wesley Fowler

Marcus Garcia

Jake Bourdow

Troy Anger

Carter Stritch

 

Womens Speed:

Corey Buhay

Catalina Shirley

Claire Poppendeck

Angela Tomczik

Angela Limbach

Kendra Stritch

Lindsay Hastings

2018/2019 International World Cup Events:

Mens Team: 

Tyler Kempney

Thomas Gehrlein

Kevin Lindlau

Carter Stritch

Troy Anger

Liam Foster

Cody Stevenson

Andrew Lamb

Marcus Garcia

Carter Stritch

 

Womens Team:

Angela Tomczik

Angela Limbach

Kendra Stritch

Lindsay Hastings

 

World Cup Youth Team:

Keenan Griscom

Calvin Daugherty

Kylie Cullen

Georgia Witchel

Aubrey Palmer

Maija Fox

MaKenzee Van Buren

Liam Foster

Cody Stevenson

Mikayla Tougas

Katie Seymour

Lindsay Levine

Christopher Atchison

Catalina Shirley

 

Support the USA Ice Climbing Team.

Read more about the 2019 USA World Cup Team here:

https://americanalpineclub.org/world-cup/2018/11/26/2019-usa-world-cup-ice-climbing-team

2019 Denver Ice Climbing World Cup Schedule:

Friday, Feb 22                     Opening Ceremony

Saturday, Feb 23                  8AM – 8PM // Lead Qualifiers, Speed Qualifiers

Sunday, Feb 24                    8AM – 5PM // Lead Semi-Finals, Lead Finals, Speed Finals, Closing Ceremony, After Party (hosted by the AAC)

About American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united

community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world’s most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world’s leading climbing library and country’s leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers’ Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and gives $100,000+ annually toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org

 

 

American Alpine Club Engages the Veteran Community with New Membership Options and Outreach

Golden, CO, November 8, 2018 The American Alpine Club (AAC), America’s oldest and largest climbing advocacy non-profit, is proudly expanding the organization’s efforts to engage active-duty military and veterans through new membership options and proactive outreach. The effort—led in large part by active-duty military members of the American Alpine Club—seeks to engage the veteran community by offering discounted club membership, hosting veteran-focused climbing events, and promoting wellness and camaraderie through the pursuit of climbing.

In spring 2018, the American Alpine Club launched a new grassroots public lands advocacy initiative known as “Hill to Crag” with the intention to take elected officials and their staff rock-climbing. The event quickly expanded in scope once AAC’s Salt Lake Chapter Chair Byron Harvison became involved. Harvison, a life-long climber and active-duty US Army Major, saw the events as an opportunity to share his and other veterans’ experiences with rock climbing and public land with lawmakers.

“After returning home from an intense deployment in Afghanistan, I found climbing not only to be a retreat back to what I loved, but a good place to settle my thoughts,” says Army Major Harvison, “In my role in the Armed Forces, I’ve seen many people deal with substance abuse and depression post deployment. Climbing facilitates positive community engagement, healthy lifestyle, and connection to wild landscapes.”

Together with Major Harvison, the American Alpine Club has organized four “Hill to Crag” events in 2018 and is rolling out a new AAC Veteran Chapter, which Harvison will Chair. The AAC also plans to extend a special membership discount to active-duty military and veterans starting in early 2019.

Phil Powers, American Alpine Club CEO, added, “The American Alpine Club has been closely linked with our nation’s armed forces for a long time. The advocacy that created the 10th Mountain Division during WWII—and the training that followed—came largely from AAC leadership. The creation of a Veterans Chapter and Major Harvison's work connecting legislators and veterans through Hill to the Crag events are logical outgrowths of this history.”

2018 Hill to Crag Event Schedule:

November 16, 2018—Chimney Rock State Park, North Carolina

October 19, 2018—Vedauwoo Recreation Area, Wyoming

October 12, 2018—Golden, Colorado, VIDEO: https://youtu.be/W5Iw1fDigHE

May 26, 2018—Joe’s Valley, Utah

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About American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world’s most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world’s leading climbing library and country’s leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers’ Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and gives $150,000+ annually toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org

Access Fund and American Alpine Club Award $10,000 in Grants to Replace Aging Bolts

Golden, CO, October 15, 2018—The Access Fund and American Alpine Club are pleased to announce the 2018 Anchor Replacement Fund grant awards. Now in its third year, the grant program launched to address the growing concerns of anchor failure and the access issues that could result from these incidents. This year, we are thrilled to announce funding for nine worthy anchor replacement projects across the country.

Rocky Pass/Gallatin Canyon, MT - Southwest Montana Climbers Coalition

Southwest Montana Climbers Coalition (SMCC) was awarded funding to replace plated 3/8” wedge anchors with 1/2” stainless steel sleeve and glue-in anchors using sustainable replacement techniques (hole re-use) to preserve the character of the routes and the rock. SMCC will engage local volunteers to expand their ability to tackle aging bolts at the gneiss and limestone crags in the region.

Red River Gorge, KY - Red River Gorge Fixed Gear Initiative

Red River Gorge Fixed Gear Initiative (RRGFGI) was awarded funding to replace rusting and aging hardware on the steep sandstone cliffs throughout the region with 1/2” stainless glue-in anchors. RRGFGI is planning to replace over 300 bad bolts in 2019 and is striving to keep bad bolts in the region to fewer than 50 at any given time. RRGFGI works to replace aging bolts throughout the Red River Gorge region.

Slab Camp, KY - Morehead Tourism Commission

Morehead Tourism Commission was awarded funding to tackle rebolting efforts at Slab Camp, a half-mile section of cliff line featuring approximately 60 routes that were originally bolted in the early 1990s with hardware store bolts and anchors. The routes include a mix of both sport and traditional, with all sport routes requiring new bolts and anchors and all traditional routes in need of new anchors. All bolts will be replaced with 1/2” stainless steel glue-ins. The Morehead Tourism Commission has enlisted the help of local climbers and rebolting experts from the Red River Gorge Fixed Gear Initiative to assist them with the effort through training and consultation on rebolting practices.

Shawangunk Mountains, NY - Mohonk Preserve

The Mohonk Preserve was awarded funding to replace eight tree and piton anchors in the Gunks with 1/2” stainless steel sleeve anchors. New bolted anchors placed below the cliff top will reduce climber impacts to the top of the cliff on routes like Gelsa in the Near Trapps. They will also replace aging piton anchors on popular routes like Son of Easy O in the Trapps.

Obed, TN - East Tennessee Climbers’ Coalition

East Tennessee Climbers’ Coalition (ETCC) was awarded funding to support their goal of rebolting the entire Obed in 5 years. ETCC is tackling replacement of approximately 4,000 aging bolts, which are all approaching 30 years of age, throughout the popular northeast Tennessee climbing area. ETCC has already undertaken this massive challenge, enlisting the help of volunteers and replacing 730 bolts with 1/2” stainless steel anchors this year alone.

Smith Rock, OR - High Desert Climbers Alliance

High Desert Climbers Alliance (HDCA) was awarded funding to replace aging hardware at Smith Rock State Park in central Oregon. HDCA will engage local volunteer bolt replacers to replace aging plated hardware that has been in the rock for over 40 years with long last 1/2” stainless steel hardware.

Boulder Canyon, CO - Boulder Climbing Community

Boulder Climbing Community (BCC) was awarded funding for rebolting efforts in Boulder Canyon and other Front Range climbing areas. The BCC will purchase 100 1/2” stainless steel sleeve bolts and hangers, as well as 40 anchor set-ups. Their annual rebolting events will take place at North Table Mountain, Boulder Canyon, and Clear Creek Canyon.

Spearfish Canyon, SD - Black Hills Climbers Coalition

The Black Hills Climbers Coalition (BHCC) was awarded funding to replace aging anchors at popular crags throughout Spearfish Canyon. The BHCC is tackling replacement of 300+ routes, which were equipped 25 years ago with plated and mixed metals. The BHCC will replace these aging anchors using high quality stainless steel glue-ins to meet the highest standards for fixed anchors at limestone sport climbing areas.

Ten Sleep Cayon, WY - Bighorn Climbers Coalition

The Bighorn Climbers Coalition (BCC) was awarded funding to address aging anchors in Ten Sleep Canyon. The BCC will focus on replacing wedge bolts, cold shuts, and worn lower-off anchors throughout the canyon. These will be replaced with 1/2” stainless steel bolts and high quality ring anchors and lower-off hooks specifically manufactured for climbing.

About Access Fund

Access Fund is the national advocacy organization that keeps climbing areas open and conserves the climbing environment. Founded in 1991, Access Fund supports and represents millions of climbers nationwide in all forms of climbing: rock climbing, ice climbing, mountaineering, and bouldering. Six core programs support the mission on national and local levels: climbing policy and advocacy, stewardship and conservation, local support and mobilization, land acquisition and protection, risk management and landowner support, and education. For more information, visit www.accessfund.org.

About American Alpine Club
The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world’s most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world’s leading climbing library and country’s leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers’ Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and gives $100,000+ annually toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org



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American Alpine Club to Host 2019 UIAA World Cup Ice Climbing Competition in Denver, CO.

Golden, CO, June 26, 2018—The American Alpine Club (AAC), America’s oldest and largest non-profit organization for climbers, is pleased to announce that UIAA World Cup Ice Climbing is coming to Denver, Colorado February 23–24, 2019. The new North American tour stop will serve as the 2018 / 2019 World Cup Ice Climbing Finals in which over 200 athletes from 26 countries around the world will compete for the overall World Cup in both Lead and Speed categories.

The 2019 event is the first time the Ice Climbing World Tour has come to Denver, Colorado. The weekend event will be held in Denver’s Civic Center Park and will be free to the public. The ice climbing competition will take place over two days with qualifying rounds on Sat, Feb 23, and semi-finals and overall finals on Sun, Feb 24.

"We are proud to support our U.S. ice climbing athletes and bring this impressive event to downtown Denver," said American Alpine Club CEO, Phil Powers. "Competitive ice climbing is one of the most exciting things I've ever watched; the stamina, skill, and seeming impossibility of it all makes for an outstanding spectator experience. They’re up there doing crazy moves, wielding sharp tools and they hang on forever.”

Competition ice climbing combines formidable over-hanging walls of ice with artful technique and sheer power. In the lead discipline, ice climbers require great technique, tactical mastery and nerves of steel to ascend seemingly improbable icy pillars dozens of feet above the ground. The speed discipline is most closely akin to all out vertical sprint using ice axes and crampons. In 2014, competitive ice climbed debuted as an exhibition sport at the Sochi Winter Olympics. The sport is currently being considered for full-scale Olympic inclusion in the 2022 Winter Games in Beijing .

Luis Benitez, Director of the Colorado Office of Outdoor Recreation Industry and event partner, also commented, “Ice climbing has a strong presence in the culture of outdoor recreation in Colorado. From our world class ice park in Ouray, to our iconic routes in Vail and Rocky Mountain National Park, this is a sport whose time has come. We are thrilled to welcome the World Cup event to Denver in February to highlight just how special ice climbing is and share that feeling with the rest of the country watching!”

The 2019 Denver World Cup Ice Climbing Competition is being hosted by the Golden, CO based American Alpine Club in partnership with the UIAA (International Climbing and Mountaineering Federation and tour organizer), the Civic Center Conservancy, Denver Sports Commission, Visit Denver, Colorado Office of Outdoor Recreation Industry, and the Denver Office of Special Events.

“We’re thrilled to help host this exciting international event in Denver’s historic Civic Center Park and expose this amazing sport to a larger population than ever in North America,” said Scott Robson, Executive Director of the non-profit Civic Center Conservancy, “Civic Center Park is the heart of Denver and has hosted iconic events for over a century. Hosting the 2019 World Cup Ice Climbing finale in such an urban setting will not only make this competition accessible to multitudes of new fans, but will also be visually stunning to watch.”

US athletes who wish to compete at the 2019 Denver World Cup will be able to earn entry at qualifying competitions. 

For additional information, including how to become a sponsor, please contact: Vickie Hormuth at [email protected] or visit: americanalpineclub.org/uiaa-federation/ 

Denver Ice Climbing World Cup Schedule:

Friday, Feb 22               
Athlete Registration

Saturday, Feb 23           
Lead Qualifiers, Speed Qualifiers

Sunday, Feb 24                
Lead Semi-Finals, Lead Finals, Speed Finals, Closing Ceremony, After Party (hosted by the American Alpine Club)


About American Alpine Club
The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world’s most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world’s leading climbing library and country’s leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers’ Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and gives $100,000+ annually toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org

2018 Live Your Dream Grant Recipients Announced

May 16, 2018, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club (AAC) and The North Face are proud to announce the recipients of the 2018 Live Your Dream grant. In total, $72,150 was awarded to 158 individuals from across the nation, making 2018 the most successful year in the history of the Live Your Dream grant program. Roughly one out of every three applicants received an award. See the complete listing of grant recipients and their trips.
 
The climbing grant for climbers, by climbers, the Live Your Dream grant seeks to fund every-day adventurers looking take their abilities to the next level. Be it transitioning out of the gym or establishing a first ascent in the greater ranges, the purpose of this grant is to support and promote unforgettable experiences for mountain adventurers—to dream big, to grow, and to inspire others.
 
The Live Your Dream grant is powered nationally by The North Face and supported locally through generous contributions from the Hans Saari Fund, the John L. Horn Memorial Fund, the Mount Washington Valley Ice Fest, proceeds stemming from the AAC's Craggin Classic Series, as well as private donations from local individuals, organizations, and fundraising efforts by local AAC Sections & Chapters.
 
The Live Your Dream grant is community developed and locally administered with grant applications read, evaluated, and awarded by seven Regional Selection Committees comprised of local community members, volunteers, and professional athletes.
 
The 2019 Live Your Dream grant cycle will open for applications on February 1, 2019.
 
FEATURED RECIPIENTS:
 
Auri Clark, from Juneau, Alaska, was awarded $400 for an all-female expedition to complete first ascents of two unnamed peaks near the Stikine Icefield. 
 
Stormy Saint-Val, from Cambridge, Massachusetts, was awarded $450 to improve her climbing skills and attend the Color the Crag climbing festival in October.
 
Arthur Whitehead, from Golden, Colorado, was awarded $500 to climb and ski Artesonraju in the Cordillera Blanca in Peru, with secondary objectives including climbing and skiing Huascarán Sur or Pisco Oeste, and climb Alpamayo. 
 
Trevor Bowman, from Flagstaff, Arizona, was awarded $1,000 to establish a new route up the east face of the Innominate (12,761’) in Wyoming’s Big Horn Mountains.
 
View all of the winners.
 

About American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Rumney Rattlesnake Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $100,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org

The American Alpine Club Announces 2018 ‘Excellence in Climbing’ Honors and Benefit Evening

May 1, 2018, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club (AAC), the country's oldest and largest climbing and mountaineering member organization, is thrilled to announce the organization's 2018 inductees to the Hall of Mountaineering Excellence and the winner of the 2018 H Adams Carter Literary Award. The honors, which recognize a lifetime of achievement in their respective categories, will be bestowed at the 3rd Annual Excellence in Climbing Celebration on June 2, 2018 at the History Colorado Center.

The Hall of Mountaineering Excellence recognizes those who have made lasting contributions both on and off the mountain. The 2018 inductees are a truly impressive class of climbers and alpinists, who have used their knowledge and success to positively influence new generations of climbers.

2018 Inductees to the Hall of Mountaineering Excellence:

Danika Gilbert - For her work with ASCEND: Leadership Through Athletics, empowering young Afghan women through climbing to become leaders who are equipped and motivated to help their society transition to peace.

David Roberts - For his storied career as a published author of over 20 books and mentorship of young  authors, preserving and growing the art of storytelling.

Doug Chabot - For co-founding the Iqra Fund, which provides access to quality education, especially for girls in the remote regions of northern Pakistan, improving their quality of life.

The H. Adams Carter Literary Award was established to recognize excellence in climbing literature. Recipients of this award have contributed extensively to the art and include honorees like Jon Krakauer, Katie Ives, John Long, and Alison Osius.

2018 H. Adams Carter Literary Award: Jeff Jackson - For a decade of dedication and inspiring work at Rock & Ice magazine.

The celebration event will be held on Saturday June 2, 2018, at History Colorado Center located at 1200 N Broadway, Denver, CO 80203. The evening includes presentations by honorees, a cocktail reception, live and silent auctions, libations, and food. And since no AAC function would be complete without a dance party, the evening will be appropriately capped-off with live 80's music by The Goonies, along with more drinks, games, and gear giveaways.

All event proceeds benefit The American Alpine Club Library and The Bradford Washburn American Mountaineering Museum, dedicated to preserving and celebrating our shared climbing history.

Tickets are very limited. For more information about the weekend activities and to reserve your spot, call (303) 384-0110 or visit americanalpineclub.org/excellence.

Registration closes on May 29, or when sold out.

About American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Rumney Rattlesnake Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $100,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org

 

The American Alpine Club and Access Fund Set Sights on Third Annual “Climb the Hill”

Climbers to advocate for public lands, climbing access and land management,

and federal support of outdoor recreation

April 13, 2018, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club (AAC) and Access Fund— two of our country’s foremost climbing advocacy non-profit organizations—are teaming up for a challenging ascent: Washington, DC’s Capitol Hill. The climbing advocacy organizations will return to Capitol Hill May 9 – 11 for their annual Climb the Hill campaign, meeting with law and policy makers and to advocate for public lands, outdoor recreation, and improved climbing management—and they’re bringing an elite team of professional climbers, outdoor industry leaders, and grassroots partners to help.

Access Fund estimates that nearly 60 percent of all rock climbing areas in the US are located on federal public land. Together, The American Alpine Club and Access Fund will advocate for balanced land management policy, with a focus on the Land Water Conservation Fund and Antiquities Act. The organizations plan to pursue legislative and administrative efforts to increase access to public lands, defend environmental protections and pursue balanced energy policies on public lands.

The two organizations are tapping a wide delegation of renowned professional climbers, including Sasha DiGiulian, Alex Honnold, Lynn Hill, Tommy Caldwell, and Margo Hayes among others. They will be joined by prominent outdoor industry executives from Patagonia, Adidas, The North Face, Patagonia, CLIF, and REI. Non-profit partners include Outdoor Alliance (OA), Latino Outdoors, Brothers of Climbing, Brown Girls Climb, American Mountain Guides Association (AMGA) and the Outdoor Industry Association (OIA).

“Climb the Hill is an incredible opportunity to bring the climbing community together and ensure we have a seat at the decision-making table. It’s a privilege to lead this project with our partners at Access Fund who have spent years working on policy issues and meeting with lawmakers. With so many attacks on public lands, this is the time to work together and galvanize climbers,” said AAC’s Policy Director Maria Povec.

“This is an opportunity for Access Fund and American Alpine Club to bring together climbing industry leaders and professional climbers to support our common cause. Climbers have helped shape our public lands system for well over a century, and we are committed to protecting our unique American landscape,” says Access Fund Policy Director Erik Murdock.

Learn more about this joint project at: ClimbTheHill.org

 

About American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Rumney Rattlesnake Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $100,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org

 

About Access Fund

Access Fund is the national advocacy organization and accredited land trust that keeps climbing areas open and conserves the climbing environment. Founded in 1991, Access Fund supports and represents millions of climbers nationwide in all forms of climbing: rock climbing, ice climbing, mountaineering, and bouldering. Six core programs support the mission on national and local levels: climbing policy and advocacy, stewardship and conservation, local support and mobilization, land acquisition and protection, risk management and landowner support, and education. Access Fund is the largest US climbing advocacy organization with over 20,000 members and 100 local affiliates. Access Fund advocates for climbers at the local and national levels, and maintains active Memorandums of Understanding with the National Park Service, US Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management. For more information, visit www.accessfund.org

 

2018 American Alpine Club Research Grant Recipients Announced

March 23, 2018, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club (AAC) is proud to announce the recipients of the 2018 Research Grants, powered by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy (NREL) and supported by Icebreaker, Kavu, the Henry Gholz Memorial Fund, and the following endowments: Lara-Karena Bitenieks Kellogg Memorial Fund, Scott Fischer Memorial Fund, Arthur K. Gilkey Memorial Fund and the Bedayn Research Fund.

The AAC Research Grants program supports scientific endeavors in mountain environments around the world. Congratulations to the 2018 Research Grant recipients:

Zeke Baker - $1,500

Bridging climbing access and impacts in a multi-use landscape: A historical political ecology of climbing in Indian Creek, Utah

Zeke Baker is a PhD candidate in Sociology at the University of California, Davis. He is investigating how various groups - rock climbers, ranchers, Native Americans, landowners, government officials, and scientists - have impacted the landscape of the Indian Creek region of Utah, and how they evaluate and make meaningful their respective impacts.  

Marie Faust - $1,225

Reproductive consequences of climate change-driven alterations in co-flowering between two subalpine plant species

Marie Faust is a master’s student in Plant Biology and Conservation at Northwestern University. She is examining how climate-driven shifts in co-flowering can affect competition for pollinator services and reproductive success in a subalpine plant species at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory in Gothic, Colorado.

Jessica Gilbert - $1,500

Assessing the impact of anthropogenic activities on high altitude biodiversity in Huascaran National Park, Peru

Jessica Gilbert is a PhD candidate in Wildlife and Fisheries Science at Texas A&M University. Her study aims to assess the impact of human activities on high altitude biodiversity in Andean ecosystems in Huascaran National Park, Peru, comparing the spatial use of habitat by mammalian carnivores in “pristine” environments and areas affected by livestock grazing our tourism activities.

Ethan Guzek - $1,020

Proposed Rockfall and Slope Stability Hazard Assessment, Frenchman Coulee Climbing Area

Ethan Guzek is a master’s student in Engineering Geology at the University of Washington. He is using standard engineering geological methods for studying rock-slope stability and rock fall hazards to conduct a safety assessment for the Sunshine Wall at the Frenchman Coulee climbing area in Washington.

Andrew Hoffman - $1,500

Deriving elevation change, validating GPRI-derived glacier velocities, and using citizen science to enrich public awareness of regional climate change on Mt. Baker, WA

Andrew Hoffman is a PhD candidate in Earth and Space Sciences at the University of Washington. He is investigating glacier speed and retreat on Mt. Baker, Washington using photogrammetry-kinematic GPS surveys, a process that incorporates citizen science efforts.

Rachel Kreb - $1,225

Ecological Restoration: Cushion Plant Facilitation on Alpine Trails

Rachel Kreb is a master’s student in Environmental Biology at Regis University. She is investigating how cushion plants respond to human-caused disturbance along restored and existing trails on Mt. Yale in Colorado.

Marti March Salas - $1,220

The effect of rock climbing on Mediterranean cliff vegetation: Implementation of an innovative and comprehensive methodology in a wide geographical range

Marti March Salas is a PhD student in Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology at the National Museum of Natural Sciences in Madrid, Spain. He is investigating the impacts of rock climbing on cliffside plant communities in Mediterranean environments by conducting surveys of species richness, plant composition, and vegetation cover in climbing locations in the US, Chile, Spain, and France.

Amy Sturgill - $1,500

Pine Creek Recreation Interaction Study: The Role of Outdoor Recreation in Shaping Sierra Nevada Bighorn Sheep Habitat Selection

Amy Sturgill is a biologist with the Sierra Nevada Bighorn Sheep Foundation and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. She is investigating the impacts of recreational use in Pine Creek Canyon, Sierra Nevada, California, on Sierra bighorn sheep habitat selection.

Thank you to our partners and Research Grant Committee members: Danika Gilbert, Louis Reichardt, Matt Hepp, Micah Jessup, and Emily Fenwick.

Part of the AAC’s mission is to respect and support the areas we enjoy, and one of the most important ways to do that is by funding research to better understand such environments. Learn more about the Research Grant: https://americanalpineclub.org/research-grants.

 

About the American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Rumney Rattlesnake Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $80,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at americanalpineclub.org.

 

 

 

Deanne Buck to Lead American Alpine Club’s Board of Directors

March 1, 2018, Golden, CO— The American Alpine Club (AAC), America’s oldest non-profit organization for climbers, is thrilled to announce Deanne Buck as incoming President of the AAC Board of Directors. Buck joins the AAC as Executive Director at Camber Outdoors, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting more inclusive, innovative active-outdoor industries through gender diversity in the workplace.

As a young person growing up in Grand Island, Nebraska, Buck credits a “25-foot high wood panel wall at a YMCA” as having changed her life. From these humble beginnings, Buck went on to integrate climbing and advocacy for climbers as a central purpose to her life. Following graduation from law school, Buck found herself working with climbing brands as an attorney until eventually joining the Access Fund as Program Director in 2003. In 2010, Buck joined the AAC as Development Director, later transitioning to a volunteer position on the AAC’s Board of Directors.  

 

Much of Buck’s professional work has focused around making outdoor experiences more accessible, both in terms of land use policy and promoting equity and diversity. Of her appointment to lead the American Alpine Club into the future, Buck says, "I am honored and humbled to serve as the President of the AAC as we are poised to move into our next chapter of influence and inclusion."

 

Phil Powers, CEO of the AAC noted both Buck’s resume and her perspective of inclusion, “Deanne’s impressive history of advocating for climbers, negotiating conservation solutions, and advancing inclusivity makes her the clear choice for President. It's a challenging job, and I know she’ll do it well.”

Buck will succeed Matt Culbertson, who has served as AAC Board President from 2016-2018.

 

About American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world’s most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world’s leading climbing library and country’s leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers’ Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and gives $100,000+ annually toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org

 

American Alpine Club Hits New Benchmark with Over 20,000 Members

January 19, 2018, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club, the country’s oldest and largest climbing and mountaineering member organization, has hit a new benchmark of over 20,000 members. Record membership comes at a time when climbing is blossoming across the US, especially in urban areas and indoor climbing faciliaties. The American Alpine Club, founded in 1902 primarily as a social club for elite adventurers, has evolved significantly over the last century to meet the changing needs of the US climbing community.

As a champion for climbing advocacy, community, and the preservation of climbing landscapes, The American Alpine Club has steadily expanded its operations to include lodging and camping solutions adjacent to popular climbing areas, offer grants to support environmental conversation and climbing exploration, provide educational opportunities to beginner climbers, and continue to host community events like the Craggin’ Classics, Hueco Rock Rodeo, and the International Climbers’ Meet (ICM).

“Watching our membership quadruple to 20,000 over the last few years has been a testament to our community and what we can do together,” said Phil Powers, CEO of The American Alpine Club, “The benefits are great but people stay because they care about sharing knowledge, participating in efforts to conserve our climbing environment and advocating for the landscapes in which we climb."

Join the club and learn more about the AAC’s impact by visiting: www.americanalpineclub.org

About American Alpine Club
The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $100,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org

 

2018 Cutting Edge Grant Recipients Announced

January 15, 2018, Golden, CO— The American Alpine Club (AAC) is pleased to annouce the recipients of the 2018 Cutting Edge Grant. The Cutting Edge Grant continues the Club’s tradition supporting climbing athletes in pursuit of world-class climbing and mountaineering objectives.

The Cutting Edge Grant seeks to fund individuals planning expeditions to remote areas featuring unexplored mountain ranges, unclimbed peaks, difficult new routes, first free ascents, or similar world-class pursuits. Objectives featuring a low-impact style and leave-no-trace mentality are looked upon with favor.  For the 2018 grant cycle, the AAC received awarded $20,000 to four recipients:

Kurt Ross ($6,000) to visit a seldom traveled region within the eastern Pakistani
Karakoram to establish a first ascent on the unclimbed peak, Karmading Brakk via
the Lachit Valley. This 6000m peak is an untouched gem, so striking it certainly
would have been previously attempted had it not been for historically restrictive
military control in the area. With these military restricts lifted, and the government
currently granting permits to climbers, Kurt and his team are ready for action.

Alan Rousseau ($6,000) to attempt the remote north face of Chiling II (6400m), in
Zanskar-Kashmir- Kishtwar region of Himal India. With a difficult, mostly
unsupported approach and hard climbing at altitude, this objective represents a
step forward in Alan’s climbing and likely one of the harder north faces he and his
team have ever attempted.

Whitney Clark ($5,000) to lead an all-woman team to the Zanskar-Kashmir-
Kishtwar region of Himal India to attempt the main summit of Arjuna’s (6230m)
West Face. Their chosen route takes the team up a steep 1400m unclimbed buttress, which lies to the left of all current established routes. The peak is accessed via a complex icefall, followed by technical high-alpine climbing. It is their goal to climb the route free and operate in a fast, light ethic.

Ryan Johnson ($3,000) to travel to the Alaska Range to attempt the East Face of Mt. Hayes (4215m). Ryan attempted the line in 2013 but extreme cold and illness
shut down the expedition. The line on Hayes is primarily an ice hose, with a 600m
steep mixed section.

The Cutting Edge Grant is supported in part by Global Rescue, the world’s leading provider of integrated travel risk and evacuation memberships. CEG recipients are additionally awarded a one-year, full Global Rescue Membership—an upgrade to the standard AAC rescue coverage. Upgraded benefits include: $500,000 of rescue evacuation; repatriation back to the US; deployed Global Rescue Personnel; and more—a service intended to help AAC members climb hard and return home safely.

The American Alpine Club has inspired and supported cutting-edge climbing achievements for over 100 years.  From funding the first ascent of Mt. Logan in 1925 to the exploration of the Karakoram in 1938, to the 2006 first ascent of Nanga Parbat’s Rupal Face, the AAC has stood to support climbers who push their physical and mental limits and celebrated their accomplishments.

Applications for the Cutting Edge Grant are accepted each year from October 1st through November 30th. For more information, visit: https://americanalpineclub.org/cutting-edge-grant/

For more information on Global Rescue and their memberships, visit: https://www.globalrescue.com/

About American Alpine Club
The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $100,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org.

 

2018 Climbing Awards Announced by The American Alpine Club

America’s Top Climbing Awards Honor Alex Honnold and Sally Jewell, among others

January 11, 2018, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club is delighted to announce the winners of the 2018 Climbing Awards honoring the most impactful climbers and conservationists within the North American climbing community. Among this year’s award honorees are big-wall free-solo pioneer Alex Honnold, teenage climbing prodigy Margo Hayes, and former US Secretary of Interior Sally Jewell.

The Annual Climbing Awards, presented by The American Alpine Club, are the longest running and most prestigious awards honoring climbing and conservation achievement in North America. The awards recognize the most dedicated and prolific climbers of their generation as well as those who have demonstrated outstanding commitment to conservation issues.

Phil Powers, American Alpine Club CEO, commented, “Though climbing's popularity has exploded recently, it was long the domain of a few bold souls. Difficult and dangerous, it is a metaphor for much in life and an inspiration to many. These awards and the people who have earned them are that inspiration.”

Top athletes recognized by the 2018 Climbing Awards include Alex Honnold, Margo Hayes, and John Roskelley. Conservation and volunteerism awards will go to Sally Jewell and Ellen Lapham.

Alex Honnold, winner of the 2018 The Robert and Miriam Underhill Award, is best known for his bold free-solo ascents in Yosemite as well as visionary ascents in Zion, El Potrero Chico, and Patagonia. Margo Hayes, winner of the 2018 The Robert Hicks Bates Award, is a climbing prodigy who as a teenager successfully climbed two 5.15a routes; considered among the most difficult routes in the world ever climbed by a woman. Roskelley, nominated for Honorary Membership, was a leader on the original American ascent team of K2 in 1978 and is renowned for high-altitude first ascents across the Himalaya.

The Annual Climbing Awards will be presented in-person to awardees at the 2018 American Alpine Club Annual Dinner, Feb 24 in Boston, MA. Past award-winners have included Yvon Chouinard, Fred Becky, Tommy Caldwell, Michael Kennedy, among other climbing legends. To purchase tickets to the Annual Dinner Event and learn more about the American Alpine Club’s Climbing Awards, please visit americanalpineclub.org/abd-awards/.

2018 Climbing Award Recipients:

Honorary Membership

Recognizing individuals who have had a lasting and highly significant impact on the advancement of the climbing craft.

Recipient: John Roskelley

The Robert and Miriam Underhill Award

Recognizing the highest level of skill in the mountaineering arts and who, through the application of this skill, courage, and perseverance, has achieved outstanding success.

Recipient: Alex Honnold

Heilprin Citation

Recognizing those who have worked to maintain and strengthen the American Alpine Club and thus further its ability to serve its fundamental purposes.

Recipient: Ellen Lapham

The Robert Hicks Bates Award

Recognizing a young climber who has demonstrated exceptional skill and character in the climbing or mountaineering arts and has outstanding promise for future accomplishment.

Recipient: Margo Hayes

The David R. Brower Award

Recognizing leadership and commitment to preserving mountain regions worldwide.

Recipient: Sally Jewell

About American Alpine Club
The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $100,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org.

 

American Alpine Club & Access Fund Award $10,000 in Grants to Replace Aging Bolts

October 16, 2017, Boulder, CO— The Access Fund and American Alpine Club are pleased to announce the 2017 Anchor Replacement Fund grant awards. Now in its third year, the grant program was launched to address the growing concerns of anchor failure and the access issues that could result from these incidents. This year, we are thrilled to announce funding for eight worthy anchor replacement projects across the country.

Sam’s Throne Anchor Replacement, AR - Arkansas Climbers Coalition
Arkansas Climbers Coalition (ARCC) was awarded funding to replace fixed anchors at Sam’s Throne in Northern Arkansas. ARCC’s volunteers will use the grant funds to replace old hardware and retire tree anchors to preserve and protect the cliff top environment. ARCC is a longtime Access Fund Affiliate and a grassroots climbing non-profit working to steward and protect Arkansas climbing.

Wichita Mountains Anchor Replacment, OK – Wichita Mountains Climbers Coalition
Wichita Mountains Climbers Coalition (WMCC) was awarded funding to replace aging fixed anchors in the Wichita Mountains of Oklahoma, including Quartz Mountain, Mt. Scott, The Narrows, Elk Mountain, The Meadows, Echo Dome, and Lost Dome. The existing hardware was installed 30-40 years ago and includes many Leeper and SMC hangers. This effort will be the largest anchor replacement project undertaken in the Wichitas to date.

Lost Crag, PA - Southwest Pennsylvania Climbers Coalition
Southwest Pennsylvania Climbers Coalition (SWPACC) was awarded funding to replace aging bolts and top-anchors at Lost Crag in Southwest Pennsylvania, using long-lasting glue-in bolts. SWPACC is an Access Fund Affiliate and local climbing organization that leads stewardship and protection of crags and boulderfields in Southwest Pennsylvania.

Hidden Cliff/Skunk Cave, ID - Southern Idaho Climbers Coalition
Southern Idaho Climbers Coalition (SICC) was awarded funding to replace aging fixed anchors at Hidden Cliff/Skunk Cave climbing area. SICC will upgrade routes with bomber, longlasting ½” stainless steel bolts and hardware. SICC is an Access Fund Affiliate local climbing organization working to protect climbing areas in the Twin Falls area.

Tierrany Wall, TN - East Tennessee Climbers’ Coalition
East Tennessee Climbers’ Coalition (ETCC) was awarded funding to replace oudated bolts at the Tierrany Wall, located inside the Obed National Wild and Scenic River area. ETTCC is an Access Fund Affiliate local climbing organization working to steward and protect East Tennessee climbing resources.

Bolton Valley, Smuggler’s Notch, and Wheeler Valley, VT - CRAG- VT
CRAG-VT was awarded funding to replace aging fixed anchors in the Bolton Valley, Smuggler’s Notch, and Wheeler Mountain areas. Many bolts at these areas have been found to be unsuitable for the rock type and have corroded. CRAG-VT will replace these bolts with stainless steel hardware that is suitable for the rock type. CRAG-VT is an Access Fund Affiliate localclimbing organization focusing on protecting climbing resources in Vermont.

Castle Rock State Park, CA - Bay Area Climbers Coalition
Bay Area Climbers Coalition (BACC) was awarded funding to upgrade aging hardware at Castle Rock State Park in California’s South Bay, replacing old button head bolts with stainless steel glue-in anchors and hardware. BACC is an Access Fund Affiliate local climbing organization focused on climbing advocacy and stewardship in the California Bay Area.

Stone Hill, MT - North West Montana Climbers Coalition
North West Montana Climbers Coalition (NWMCC) was awarded funding to replace old hardware at the Stone Hill climbing area in Northwest Montana. In many cases these bolts are over 30 years old and in dire need for replacement. NWMCC is a new local climbing organization that recently attained 501(c)3 status and is seeking to further it’s engagement in climbing access and conservation work in Northwest Montana.



About Access Fund
Access Fund is the national advocacy organization that keeps climbing areas open and conserves the climbing environment. Founded in 1991, Access Fund supports and represents millions of climbers nationwide in all forms of climbing: rock climbing, ice climbing, mountaineering, and bouldering. Six core programs support the mission on national and local levels: climbing policy and advocacy, stewardship and conservation, local support and mobilization, land acquisition and protection, risk management and landowner support, and education. For more information, visit www.accessfund.org.

About American Alpine Club
The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $100,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org.

2018 Annual Benefit Dinner: 40th Anniversary of Americans on K2

October 12, 2017, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club is proud to celebrate the 40-year-anniversary of Americans on the summit of K2 at the 2018 Annual Benefit Dinner. The event will feature Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner as the keynote speaker and will be presented by LOWA and Global Rescue. The Dinner serves as one of the largest annual gatherings within the climbing community, celebrating the history of our sport with some of climbing’s brightest stars.

Kaltenbrunner will speak February 24, 2018, at The Fairmont Copley Plaza Hotel (138 Saint James Avenue, Boston, MA). Kaltenbrunner has been called “a Queen Among Kings” by Outside Magazine. She is the second woman to climb the fourteen 8,000 meter peaks and the first woman to do so without the use of supplementary oxygen or high altitude porters. K2 was the final challenge, which she summited via the lesser climbed North Pillar route.

Additional weekend festivities are open to the public and kick off Friday, February 23 with the Annual Membership Meeting and Climbers' Gathering at Central Rock Gym (74 Acton St, Watertown, MA 02472). The Climbers’ Gathering includes a food truck, libations, and a star-studded climbing competition. Additionally, Saturday morning’s special panel discussions, at the Fairmont Copley Plaza, are open to public. Panelists will discuss topics affecting today’s climbing community and reflect on our community’s past.

The main event of the weekend—the Annual Benefit Dinner—begins at 6pm on the 24th. The evening gathers all generations of climbers for an inspiring evening benefiting the Club’s programs. In addition to Kaltenbrunner's keynote address, attendees will enjoy fine dining, beer and wine, live and silent auctions, and acceptance speeches from this year’s awardees.

The event is expected to sell out and tickets are limited. For more information and to reserve your spot, visit americanalpineclub.org/annual-benefit-dinner. Registration closes on February 14, or when sold out.

About the American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Mountaineering; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages five campgrounds as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $100,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at americanalpineclub.org.

 

American Alpine Club Secures Campground in Rumney, New Hampshire

August 28, 2017, Golden, CO—The American Alpine Club (AAC) has purchased a 15 acre campground in Rumney, New Hampshire, within walking distance of Rumney Rocks Climbing Area.

"Rumney is one of the country's finest sport-climbing destinations,” said AAC CEO Phil Powers. “With visitation on the rise, and with more than 22 million Americans and Canadians within weekend striking distance, the American Alpine Club is proud to participate in a sustainable long-term camping solution for this popular spot.”

The Rumney Campground will build upon the success of the current campground and create a place for climbers to stay and for the climbing community to gather near the popular Northeast climbing area. The beautiful 15-acre property sits along the Baker River in Rumney, NH and was previously owned and operated by Tom and Marsha Camara. The AAC will continue the good work of the Camara’s by providing a communal first-come first-serve camping option. Look for a few private reservable sites to be added soon for those wanting a guaranteed spot before arrival. Porta-potties and access to potable water at the barn will remain the same through the end of 2017.

The AAC plans to open the existing barn to campers and climbers as a community space and a place to gather when the weather turns. In addition, the AAC will add bathrooms and showers to the barn.

The campground is located across the street from the Meadows and Parking Lot Wall areas on the east side of the crags. Rumney Rocks, mainly known as a sport climbing destination, has close to 1,000 routes for all ability levels (from 5.3 to 5.15) and also offers traditional climbing and bouldering options.

“With the Rumney Campground now part of the AAC's growing lodging network, we are looking forward to welcoming climbers from around the Northeast and the world to experience this wonderful place, learn, challenge themselves, and meet old and new friends," said Powers.

For information on the Rumney campground and progress updates, visit our website at: https://americanalpineclub.org/rumney-rattlesnake-campground.

 

About American Alpine Club

The American Alpine Club is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose vision is a united community of competent climbers and healthy climbing landscapes. Together with our members, the AAC advocates for American climbers domestically and around the world; provides grants and volunteer opportunities to protect and conserve the places we climb; hosts local and national climbing festivals and events; publishes two of the world's most sought-after climbing annuals, the American Alpine Journal and Accidents in North American Climbing; cares for the world's leading climbing library and country's leading mountaineering museum; manages the Hueco Rock Ranch, New River Gorge Campground, Samuel F. Pryor Shawangunk Gateway Campground, and Grand Teton Climbers' Ranch as part of a larger lodging network for climbers; and annually gives $80,000+ toward climbing, conservation, and research grants that fund adventurers who travel the world. Learn about additional programs and become a member at www.americanalpineclub.org.